Major League: Back To The Minors

  • 1998
  • Movie
  • PG-13
  • Comedy, Sports

Considering the lower-than-low expectations for this third installment in the ongoing shaggy jock story of quirky, loser baseball teams (especially given the conspicuous absence of top-lined Charlie Sheen and Tom Berenger), this old stew isn't half bad. And that makes it pretty damn good, if your idea of a thing of beauty is a line drive down the first-base...read more

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Reviewed by Sandra Contreras
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Considering the lower-than-low expectations for this third installment in the ongoing shaggy jock story of quirky, loser baseball teams (especially given the conspicuous absence of top-lined Charlie Sheen and Tom Berenger), this old stew isn't half

bad. And that makes it pretty damn good, if your idea of a thing of beauty is a line drive down the first-base line. Back from the previous movies is hissably conceited Roger Dorn (Corbin Bernsen), who's taken yet another step up the baseball food chain. In the first film he was a player for the

underdog Cleveland Indians and in the second he owned the team; now he's bought the Minnesota Twins and recruited washed up minor-league pitcher Gus Cantrell (Scott Bakula) to coach the Twins' bedraggled minor-league brethren, the Buzz. Cantrell's mission is to make a real team out of a bunch of

kooks like ballet dancer turned ballplayer Lance the Dance and voodoo-practicing Cuban outfielder Pedro Cerrano (Dennis Haysbert), another holdover from previous installments. Gus clashes with stuck-up Twins manager Leonard Huff (Ted McGinley), a helmet-haired slickster, and challenges the Twins

to play the Buzz. MAJOR LEAGUE II was hackneyed and obnoxious, so this installment is a pleasant surprise, chiefly because Bakula's charming and believable presence gives the movie some much-needed heart.

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  • Released: 1998
  • Rating: PG-13
  • Review: Considering the lower-than-low expectations for this third installment in the ongoing shaggy jock story of quirky, loser baseball teams (especially given the conspicuous absence of top-lined Charlie Sheen and Tom Berenger), this old stew isn't half bad. A… (more)

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