Little Boy Lost

  • 1953
  • 1 HR 35 MIN
  • NR
  • Drama

As a war correspondent in occupied France, Crosby married and fathered a son. The war is now over, and his wife is dead, executed by the Nazis for being active in the resistance movement. He has lost track of his son and is determined to find the boy. At a Parisian orphanage, he is introduced to Fourcade, an eight-year-old boy with some resemblance to Crosby's...read more

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As a war correspondent in occupied France, Crosby married and fathered a son. The war is now over, and his wife is dead, executed by the Nazis for being active in the resistance movement. He has lost track of his son and is determined to find the boy. At a Parisian orphanage, he is

introduced to Fourcade, an eight-year-old boy with some resemblance to Crosby's late wife. In order to ascertain whether the boy is really his son, he takes the lad to their old apartment, but the child doesn't seem to remember it. However, a few days later the boy seems to know everything quite

well. Crosby is almost convinced until Fourcade mentions a shop that was built after the war. He discovers that the boy has been coached by Dorziat, the nun in charge of the orphanage. She explains herself by telling Crosby that she would do anything to see one of the war orphans have a chance at

a good life. Crosby has grown attached to the child, but the memory of his wife continues to haunt him. Dauphin, an old friend, confronts him. He too has lost a wife to the war and tells Crosby that the dead should be laid to rest and that Fourcade needs a father, not an orphanage. With this in

mind, Crosby returns to adopt the child. Crosby and Fourcade are quite a team. Both give sensitive and moving performances. Fourcade is all the more amazing in that this was his first role. The eight-year-old pulls off a difficult characterization like a seasoned veteran. Seaton's direction tends

to run a little on the sentimental side but holds interest throughout. The on-location Paris backgrounds are nicely used. Crosby also sings a few songs, "The Magic Window," "Cela M'Est Egal," "A Propos de Rien" (Johnny Burke, James Van Heusen) and a French version of "Oh, Susanna" (Stephen

Foster), that really aren't necessary for the film's development, though they probably helped the box office. This was the second version of the story by Laski. An earlier telling was made for television a year or so before this.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: As a war correspondent in occupied France, Crosby married and fathered a son. The war is now over, and his wife is dead, executed by the Nazis for being active in the resistance movement. He has lost track of his son and is determined to find the boy. At a… (more)

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