Jean De Florette

  • 1986
  • Movie
  • PG
  • Drama

The most talked-about French production in many years, this picture and its sequel, MANON OF THE SPRING (MANON DES SOURCES), were completed at a combined record-breaking budget of $17 million (about eight times the cost of the average French picture). Shot back to back with its successor, JEAN DE FLORETTE is set in a French farming village tucked into a...read more

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The most talked-about French production in many years, this picture and its sequel, MANON OF THE SPRING (MANON DES SOURCES), were completed at a combined record-breaking budget of $17 million (about eight times the cost of the average French picture). Shot back to back with its successor,

JEAN DE FLORETTE is set in a French farming village tucked into a picturesque hillside.

Le Papet (Yves Montand), an imperious and unscrupulous local landowner, welcomes the return to the village of his nephew, Ugolin (Daniel Auteuil). An unappealing social misfit, Ugolin dreams of making his fortune by growing carnations. Carnations, however, need a great deal of water--a sparse

commodity in the village. When Le Papet realizes that Ugolin's idea is potentially profitable, he sets his sights on a neighboring farm that has an untapped natural spring. But the farm is owned by Jean Cadoret (Gerard Depardieu), a hunchbacked ex-tax collector who has bid farewell to the city and

proves to be a tenacious convert to the farming life.

Directed by Claude Berri, JEAN DE FLORETTE is based on Marcel Pagnol's two-part novel L'Eau des Collines (The Water of the Hills), which, in turn, was based on an unsuccessful 1952 film Pagnol directed. A throwback to the pre-New Wave days of French cinema, the film offers complex

characterizations, careful scripting, and lyrically pastoral images.

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  • Released: 1986
  • Rating: PG
  • Review: The most talked-about French production in many years, this picture and its sequel, MANON OF THE SPRING (MANON DES SOURCES), were completed at a combined record-breaking budget of $17 million (about eight times the cost of the average French picture). Shot… (more)

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