Intervista

  • 1987
  • 1 HR 45 MIN
  • NR
  • Biography

Freewheeling autobiographical film in which Fellini (who appears as himself, the director of a new project--an adaptation of Franz Kafka's Amerika) strings together a loose collection of anecdotes and sketches. The linking device is a Japanese TV documentary crew who question the director about his career. Fellini remembers his days as a young reporter...read more

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Freewheeling autobiographical film in which Fellini (who appears as himself, the director of a new project--an adaptation of Franz Kafka's Amerika) strings together a loose collection of anecdotes and sketches. The linking device is a Japanese TV documentary crew who question the director

about his career. Fellini remembers his days as a young reporter assigned his first interview at Cinecitta Studios with a glamorous, aging movie star (Liguori) who steps from her steamy shower to answer his questions. He also reconstructs his youthful trolley ride to Cinecitta Studios, located

just outside of Rome, filling the trolley with the faces that he remembers from his youth, including a pretty blonde starlet who is on her way to her first screen test. Outside the windows are Rome's city streets, gorgeous waterfalls, a herd of elephants, and a tribe of Indians--recollections of

fantasies which the great director fabricated within Cinecitta's walls. When the trolley arrives, the starlet runs off with her fiance, and Fellini comments that he never saw her again. Once inside the studio, Fellini wanders through various soundstages. On an outdoor stage, Rubini nearly ruins a

long take of a wedding scene by accidentally walking past while the cameras are rolling. As INTERVISTA continues, Fellini talks with the Japanese crew, with Rubini, and with various members of his real-life film crew: assistant director Maurizio Mein, cinematographer Tonino Delli Colli, and art

director Danilo Donati. They discuss Fellini's upcoming adaptation of Amerika, a project which was actually being prepared by Fellini and INTERVISTA producer Moussa at the time. On a casting assignment, Mein interviews numerous applicants for small roles--all of which require actors with the

"Fellini face." He rides the subway, snapping photographs and offering people parts in the film. Later, during a bomb scare at Cinecitta's art department, Mastroianni appears outside the office window dressed like Mandrake the Magician and waving a wand. He is at the studio to film a TV

commercial, but decides instead to run off with Fellini to visit Anita Ekberg, Mastroianni's costar in LA DOLCE VITA. Once arrived at Ekberg's country estate, Mastroianni waves his wand and, from a magical puff of smoke, a scene from LA DOLCE VITA appears. The soft, dreamy strains of Nino Rota's

score are heard as we see Mastroianni and Ekberg, both looking fresher and thinner than today, dance romantically and then embrace in the classic Trevi Fountain scene. Together, the same pair, now 27 years older, watch themselves as part of the cast of INTERVISTA with Ekberg shedding a nostalgic

tear. The curious finale has the entire cast and crew preparing to film a scene on a Cinecitta backlot (which duplicates the ending of Fellini's 8 1/2) when a downpour halts production. Everyone scurries under a hastily rigged canopy. Night soon falls, but the rain continues. By dawn, the rain has

stopped, but the entire crew is attacked by the tribe of Indians seen during the film's opening trolley ride. The Indians circle the film "troops" and are finally dispersed by gun-toting crew members. The production "wraps" and Fellini, now alone in a spotlit soundstage, decides to end his film.

INTERVISTA play as an enjoyable, lightweight entertainment, filled with the usual Felliniesque characters, faces, and situations. Originally conceived as a film for Italian television, the project grew to a size where it warranted theatrical release. First called "A Director's Block Notes," it was

then retitled APPUNTI DI FEDERICO FELLINI ("Federico Fellini's Notebooks"). At one point, Fellini had wanted to title it with the Japanese word for interview. "I imagined the Japanese for interview," he explained, "would be some suave, cabalistic sequence of sounds--something like RASHOMON. So I

made inquiries. Alas, the Japanese word for interview is...interview."

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  • Released: 1987
  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Freewheeling autobiographical film in which Fellini (who appears as himself, the director of a new project--an adaptation of Franz Kafka's Amerika) strings together a loose collection of anecdotes and sketches. The linking device is a Japanese TV documenta… (more)

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