I Met My Love Again

This is what Hollywood producers in the 1930s would term "a woman's film," one that concentrated on romance, lost love, and a last chance for bliss. Studious, shy Fonda and exciting Bennett are a twosome in a small Vermont town until dashing young writer Marshal appears and captures Bennett's heart. It's 1927 and the decade is still roaring. Bennett and...read more

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This is what Hollywood producers in the 1930s would term "a woman's film," one that concentrated on romance, lost love, and a last chance for bliss. Studious, shy Fonda and exciting Bennett are a twosome in a small Vermont town until dashing young writer Marshal appears and captures

Bennett's heart. It's 1927 and the decade is still roaring. Bennett and Marshal roar off with it to Paris where they settle down, live in a loft, and have a child. He becomes an alcoholic and is dead a decade later. Bennett returns to the Vermont homestead to find Fonda, a dour biology professor

and a dedicated bachelor. With Bennett is her 10-year-old daughter. Fonda pretends he's no longer interested in her and most of the town mistreats the wayward Bennett for spurning the hometown boy. Fonda's life is all the more miserable since one of his students, Platt, is continually on the prowl

for him. She is a rich, spoiled brat of a young lady who demands that Fonda love her, threatening to commit suicide if he doesn't. Fonda finally escapes Platt's machinations and returns to the warm embrace of Bennett. The pair pick up almost where they left off 10 years earlier and plan a life

together, surmounting the wagging tongues of gossips, interference from love-sick sophomores, and a series of mishaps, to rekindle a love that has never died. It's pretty gooey in places, but a palatable film nevertheless. Bennett, who was the paramour and wife-to-be of producer Wanger, does a

good job as the adventurous lady, and Fonda is properly phlegmatic as the jilted lover, though his lack of enthusiasm for the role is apparent. There's not much to it, and Wanger only selected him because he had appeared in a similar vehicle, THAT CERTAIN WOMAN (with Bette Davis), in 1937. The

only interest the actor had in this lackluster production was that his old friend Joshua Logan--they had worked together in the University Players in New York--co-directed the film, an assignment Logan did not appreciate, particularly when George Cukor was later brought in to reshoot many of

Logan's scenes. Logan would leave Hollywood after this brief stint and not return until he directed PICNIC in 1956, a hiatus of 18 years.

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