I Love You, Don't Touch Me!

  • 1998
  • 1 HR 26 MIN
  • R
  • Comedy, Romance

Indie cinema can be pretentious and extremely crude, and in that context Julie Davis's writing and directing debut not only looks pretty good, but actually has some claim to gloss. That said, while it's true that other people have made much worse movies at hundreds of times its modest budget -- $70,000 -- that's not exactly a blockbuster selling point....read more

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Reviewed by Sandra Contreras
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Indie cinema can be pretentious and extremely crude, and in that context Julie Davis's writing and directing debut not only looks pretty good, but actually has some claim to gloss. That said, while it's true that other people have made much worse

movies at hundreds of times its modest budget -- $70,000 -- that's not exactly a blockbuster selling point. Davis's heroine, Katie (Marla Schaffel), is a 25-year-old virgin and self-described hopeless romantic. Katie isn't easy to love: She's neurotic, narcissistic, whining, suspicious, priggish,

disdainful of her contemporaries' mores and refuses to see a therapist. But best friend Ben (Mitchell Whitfield) loves her anyway, even though she's not generous enough to return the favor. She keeps setting him up on implausible dates until one -- with her coworker Janet (Meredith Scott Lynn) --

sticks. The movie has modest ambitions: to free Katie from her oppressive virginity and maybe to hook her up with Ben, who's obviously her soul mate. The first project is rather more interesting than the second, and in its service Katie crashes her car into a rich and glamorous older composer

(Michael Harris), who finally gets her into the sack. Davis has a considerable talent for crafting small, insightful scenes, and her movie is genuinely amusing; unfortunately, this kind of material is amply covered in sitcoms for free.

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  • Released: 1998
  • Rating: R
  • Review: Indie cinema can be pretentious and extremely crude, and in that context Julie Davis's writing and directing debut not only looks pretty good, but actually has some claim to gloss. That said, while it's true that other people have made much worse movies a… (more)

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