House Of Wax

Paddleball anyone? This fine remake of the classic THE MYSTERY OF THE WAX MUSEUM was filmed in 3-D and employed "WarnerPhonic Sound," a forerunner to stereo that utilized a number of speakers. Vincent Price plays Professor Henry Jarrod, a wax sculptor in New York at the turn of the century who presides over a wax museum that is floundering because of his...read more

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Paddleball anyone? This fine remake of the classic THE MYSTERY OF THE WAX MUSEUM was filmed in 3-D and employed "WarnerPhonic Sound," a forerunner to stereo that utilized a number of speakers.

Vincent Price plays Professor Henry Jarrod, a wax sculptor in New York at the turn of the century who presides over a wax museum that is floundering because of his pursuit of beauty rather than sensationalism. When Jarrod again refuses partner Burke's (Roy Roberts) request to create more

horrifying pieces, Burke sets fire to the museum, intent on collecting the insurance money. It is presumed that Jarrod died with his creations, but he returns, horribly scarred, and strangles Burke. Years later, Jarrod, feigning a wheelchair-confining back injury, opens a new wax museum with even

more lifelike displays. Because his hands have been horribly burned, he employs two assistants to do the sculpting under his supervision (one of whom is played by Charles Bronson, then billed as Buchinsky). In reality, however, Jarrod's mad sculpting is accomplished by pouring wax over people he

has murdered.

HOUSE OF WAX was stunningly directed by Andre de Toth who used the new 3-D process to its fullest potential without bogging down the narrative with too many "gee-look-what-I-can-do" tricks. Ironically, this man who saw the potential of 3-D and who directed one of the most effective movies ever

shot in that process had only one eye, which hampered his depth perception. Price is magnificent as usual and manages to steal the role of Professor Jarrod from its creator, Lionel Atwill. Although it is now extremely difficult to see in its original format, HOUSE OF WAX is still well worth

viewing in flat prints or on video. The line that kills 'em in revival houses: "You never see things like this in Provincetown." Oh, but you do.

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