Honor And Glory

Though HONOR AND GLORY was released (direct-to-video in the US) as a vehicle for prolific action starlet Cynthia Rothrock, she yields the spotlight here to newcomer Donna Jason. Joyce Pride (Donna Jason) is a muckraking TV reporter and indestructible kung fu ace, while sister Tracy Pride (Cynthia Rothrock), is an FBI agent, and indestructible kung fu ace....read more

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Though HONOR AND GLORY was released (direct-to-video in the US) as a vehicle for prolific action starlet Cynthia Rothrock, she yields the spotlight here to newcomer Donna Jason.

Joyce Pride (Donna Jason) is a muckraking TV reporter and indestructible kung fu ace, while sister Tracy Pride (Cynthia Rothrock), is an FBI agent, and indestructible kung fu ace. Joyce's big story is the malfeasance of Jason Slade (John Miller), hateful CEO of the Bank of Business and Trade

International (a parallel to the real-life Bank of Credit and Commerce International). He's embezzled at least a billion dollars but has even bigger plans. A nuclear detonator, swiped from the Russians, is for sale. Slade wants to broker a $3 billion deal to get the gadget to the Arabs. Too late

he discovers that the nuclear trigger is a hoax, bait in a government sting operation run by John Pride (Leo Rocca). The villain seizes and tortures him, drawing both daughters together to save him, supported by Jake Armstrong (Chuck Jeffreys), one-time Slade bodyguard turned good guy, among

others. They slam Slade around the warehouse before the cops arrive, bringing with them the abrupt closing credits and enough loose ends to fuel a sequel.

In an unusual move for the genre, Herb Borkland's script has more talk than action, concentrating on characters and relationships. There's Jake, Slade's main bodyguard and indestructible kung fu ace. He gradually realizes he's working for a no-goodnik and goes to ally himself (in more ways than

one) with sexy newshound Joyce. There's Joyce's father, John Pride, a CIA honcho long estranged from his journalist daughter despite Tracy's constant efforts to reconcile the two.

There's more, but the point is that one gets the rare sight of kung fu performers exerting their acting muscles for once, and most of them aren't bad, though cobra-eyed John Miller has an extremely silly Evil-Businessman role as the hissable Slade, a chopsocky caricature of WALL STREET's Gordon

Gekko. The filmmakers don't miss any yuppie cliches as greedy Slade preens, swindles, kills, swills Perrier, works out, makes the cover of GQ, and gets an invite to a prayer breakfast with his pal ex-President Reagan.

HONOR AND GLORY itself would have been worthier of a follow up if only it bore a tighter plot and less grungy-looking production values (pic was filmed off the beaten track, in Prince George County, Maryland). One nice touch is that these indestructible kung fu aces incorporate martial arts moves

into everyday functions, from answering the phone to eating dinner, and show due respect for their Asian masters' language and traditions. That may be because director Godfrey Hall is actually "Godfrey Ho," a known alias of Hong Kong action helmer Ho Chih-chiang. (Violence, profanity.)

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