Hit And Runway

Director Christopher Livingston and his co-writer Jaffe Cohen cram more subplots, minor characters and comic situations into 100 minutes than most sitcoms burn through in an entire season. And that's not necessarily a good thing: The charms of this odd-couple comedy are slight and easily lost in the clutter. Aspiring screenwriter Alex Andero (Michael Parducci)...read more

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Reviewed by Ken Fox
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Director Christopher Livingston and his co-writer Jaffe Cohen cram more subplots, minor characters and comic situations into 100 minutes than most sitcoms burn through in an entire season. And that's not necessarily a good thing: The charms of this odd-couple comedy are slight and easily lost in the clutter. Aspiring screenwriter Alex Andero (Michael Parducci) is currently living in the basement of his family's restaurant in New York City's Little Italy. His older brother (John Fiore) wants Alex to take over the family business, but Alex's hopes are pinned on a guaranteed blockbuster called Hit and Runway, about a cop working undercover as a fashion model, tailored especially to the talents of action superstar Jagger Stevens (Hoyt Richards). All Alex needs is the talent to write it. Enter gay, Jewish screenwriter Elliot Springer (Peter Jacobson), who's nursing a hopeless crush on Joey (Dawson's Creek's Kerr Smith), a dishy young actor who's waiting tables at Andero's while waiting for his big break. When Alex finds a script that the lovesick Elliot has left behind for Joey to read, he tries to lure Elliot into a partnership. Elliot agrees, but only on one condition: Alex must first fix him up with Joey. An interesting friendship eventually develops between homophobic Alex, who wants nothing more than to buy into the Hollywood racket, and insecure Elliot, who refuses to sell out, but it takes forever getting there. Irrelevant complications involving Alex's own love life, family pressure to give up on the writing thing and join the family business, and a host of secondary characters keep getting in the way, and each scene lingers on far too long. That said, Livingston directs with style to spare, and Jacobson is a likeable schlub, even if he does lay on the Yiddish mannerisms a little thick.

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