Head Over Heels

Made in 1999, this failed "romantic-comedy-thriller" cooled its heels for more than a year before stumbling into theaters. If you try to imagine a breezy Cary Grant movie in which Grant makes penis and fart jokes, you'll have some idea just how wretched it is. Amanda Pierce (Monica Potter, styled to look like Julia Roberts) is a lovelorn art...read more

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Reviewed by Frank Lovece
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Made in 1999, this failed "romantic-comedy-thriller" cooled its heels for more

than a year before stumbling into theaters. If you try to imagine a breezy

Cary Grant movie in which Grant makes penis and fart jokes, you'll have some

idea just how wretched it is. Amanda Pierce (Monica Potter, styled to look

like Julia Roberts) is a lovelorn art restorer for NYC's Metropolitan Museum

of Art. After leaving her unfaithful boyfriend, she moves in with four

struggling models, played by real-life mannequins Shalom Harlow, Tomiko

Fraser, Ivana Milicevic and Sarah O'Hare (basically the Spice Girls but

without the singing). Well-meaning, slightly obtuse but with hearts as big as

their shoe closets (and sort of fun, in a lovable-patsy way), the models help

Amanda meet her dream guy, purported fashion entrepreneur Jim Winston (Freddie

Prinze Jr., who has the comic timing of an undertaker). They later help her

play detective when she thinks she sees Jim murder someone. Never reaching the

minimum requirements of either "witty" or "wacky," this is one of those movies

that ostensibly takes place in the real world (as opposed to that of a surreal, WAYNE'S WORLD-type farce) but is so ineptly plotted it's practically

senseless. Nobody even looks up as people fire guns on busy city streets and

fight wildly backstage at a fashion show. The FBI colludes with the New

York Post to publish a fake front-page story. And what art restorer would

paint the face of her latest crush onto an irreplaceable Titian? The movie

gets its few non-potty laughs from comically exaggerating people's perceptions

of models. This leads to the film's only funny bits, such as Amanda jumping up

and trying to grab a piece of paper the very tall Jade (Harlow) is holding up

high. Potter, to her credit, has a nice, sassy delivery, as if even she can't

believe the painfully ridiculous things she has to say.

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