Cube

It's more like an interactive computer game than a conventional sci-fi thriller, but it's good, grisly fun nonetheless. Six strangers awake to find themselves trapped inside a giant Rubik's Cube-like prison, a huge complex of some 17,000 interconnected, perfectly square cells. There's a hatchway on each of the cells' six surfaces that leads to the adjoining...read more

Where to Watch

Available to Stream

Reviewed by Ken Fox
Rating:

It's more like an interactive computer game than a conventional sci-fi thriller, but it's good, grisly fun nonetheless. Six strangers awake to find themselves trapped inside a giant Rubik's Cube-like prison, a huge complex of some 17,000 interconnected,

perfectly square cells. There's a hatchway on each of the cells' six surfaces that leads to the adjoining cube and, hopefully, the outside world. But there's a nasty catch: Some of the cubes are safe to pass through, others are booby-trapped in devious, deadly ways, and there's no clear way to

tell them apart. The object: Increasingly paranoid prisoners must move from block to block in order to reach the surface without a) getting sliced and diced by the traps; b) dying of starvation; or c) killing each another first. It's a high-concept setup, with shades of The Prisoner and THX

1138, and it's to writer-director Vincenzo Natali's considerable credit that he manages to keep it interesting with various twists and unexpected turns. Natali's underlying theme -- something about the evils of our increasingly compartmentalized society -- is intriguing but never fully fleshed

out, a number of key performances are grating and the dialogue is occasionally downright awful. So it ain't Sartre, but it doesn't need to be. Natali's film has a fabulous look, a nerve-wracking, claustrophobic mood, a number of genuinely suspenseful set-pieces and some sublimely stomach-churning

special effects. Barf bags recommended.

TV Yearbook

We honor TV's graduating class and freshmen most likely to succeed

MIXED-ISH - In "mixed-ish," Rainbow Johnson recounts her experience growing up in a mixed-race family in the '80s and the constant dilemmas they had to face over whether to assimilate or stay true to themselves. Bow's parents Paul and Alicia decide to move from a hippie commune to the suburbs to better provide for their family. As her parents struggle with the challenges of their new life, Bow and her siblings navigate a mainstream school in which they're perceived as neither black nor white. This family's experiences illuminate the challenges of finding one's own identity when the rest of the world can't decide where you belong. (ABC/Kelsey McNeal)
MYKAL-MICHELLE HARRIS, ARICA HIMMEL, ETHAN WILLIAM CHILDRESS

Best New Fall TV Shows

The hottest new broadcast TV series

My News

Sign up and add shows to get the latest updates about your favorite shows - Start Now