Cloak And Dagger

The boy who cried wolf. Producer Carr took some time off from making musicals to oversee this surprisingly good thriller. Thomas is a young child with a great imagination and his own computer. Nobody believes Thomas's tall tales because they're all going on in his head; so when he accidentally uncovers a plot to smuggle top secret information out of the...read more

Rating:

The boy who cried wolf. Producer Carr took some time off from making musicals to oversee this surprisingly good thriller. Thomas is a young child with a great imagination and his own computer. Nobody believes Thomas's tall tales because they're all going on in his head; so when he

accidentally uncovers a plot to smuggle top secret information out of the US, his fear is again perceived to be part of his active fantasy world. He runs to his father, Coleman, who doesn't believe him. Thomas has been playing a game called Cloak and Dagger on his computer, and Coleman thinks his

son may have confused reality with fantasy. Thomas has conjured up a character in his mind named Jack Flack (also played by Coleman) who pops up to help Thomas whenever the lad gets into a pickle. Meanwhile, Thomas and his friend Nigra find themselves trapped in the real-life plot.

CLOAK benefits from tight direction and the good humor of the Holland script. The addition of the dual role for Coleman (who's excellent in both) serves to highlight the relationship between father and son, adding another dimension to the yarn and almost relegating the spy plot from the core

element of the story to mere diversion. Murphy is properly heinous as the heavy, and there are good cameos by veterans McIntire and Nolan as a kindly old tourist couple who turn out to be anything but kindly. Thomas, who was the star of E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL, is remarkably natural in a role

that might have had other child actors reeling. A film with much to recommend it, CLOAK AND DAGGER feels like a Hitchcock movie produced by Walt Disney.

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