Get On The Bus

A group of African-American men take a Los Angeles-to-Washington bus trip so they can attend Minister Louis Farrakhan's Million Man March, and try to solve the problems of the world -- or at least their corner of it -- en route. The bus riders are a carefully constructed cross section of African-American men -- gay, straight, biracial, Black Muslim, old,...read more

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A group of African-American men take a Los Angeles-to-Washington bus trip so they can attend Minister Louis Farrakhan's Million Man March, and try to solve the problems of the world -- or at least their corner of it -- en route. The bus riders are a carefully constructed cross

section of African-American men -- gay, straight, biracial, Black Muslim, old, young, poor and priviledged -- and they're not characters so much as position statements. The drama depends on regular declarations about sex, politics, racial identity or some other hot-button topic, to which the rest

of the riders can react according to their boldly delineated opinions. But the cast tries to inject some semblance of humanity into the debating society rhetoric, and the film is surprisingly free of the strident, hectoring tone that so regularly mars Lee's films. He and screenwriter Reggie Rock

Bythewood even poke a little fun at Lee himself, in the form of an eager-beaver film student named Xavier (Hill Harper), who annoys the hell out of everyone with the self-important documentary he's making about his journey of self-discovery. It all has an artless, ephemeral feel, and 20 years from

now people will marvel at the fashions, the landscapes and the attitudes it captures like fragile bugs in amber.

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