Amityville: A New Generation

  • 1993
  • 1 HR 32 MIN
  • R
  • Horror

AMITYVILLE: A NEW GENERATION tries scarily to bridge the gap between old, unspeakable evil and new terrors, but the house-haunting specters have lost their ability to chill anyone but a real estate agent with a property full of poltergeists to unload. In a gentrified neighborhood, landlord Dick Cutler (David Naughton) rents lofts to struggling artists like...read more

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AMITYVILLE: A NEW GENERATION tries scarily to bridge the gap between old, unspeakable evil and new terrors, but the house-haunting specters have lost their ability to chill anyone but a real estate agent with a property full of poltergeists to unload.

In a gentrified neighborhood, landlord Dick Cutler (David Naughton) rents lofts to struggling artists like Keyes Terry (Ross Partridge), his main squeeze, Llani (Lala Sloatman), and their best friend, Suki (Julia Nickson-Soul). Things are looking up when Dick permits an exhibition of their work on

the premises. Before the show can take place, Keyes unforeseeably brings chaos into the building by accepting an antique mirror from an eerily familiar homeless man, Franklin Bronner (Jack R. Orend); the looking-glass reflects the terrible Amityville legacy (including a murderous episode which

occurred during Keyes's childhood.)

Made uncomfortable by the ornate mirror, Keyes eagerly gives it to Suki, who becomes mesmerized by it. When an abusive ex-boyfriend slashes her artwork, the possessive mirror bashes in his head for her. Initially, a police investigation by Detective Clark (Terry O'Quinn) does not countenance

ghostly interference. Then, after a frenzied spate of painting activity, Suki is hypnotized by the mirror into committing suicide. Seeking a logical explanation for the body count at this building, Detective Clark discovers a link between the recently deceased Bronner and Keyes. Keyes is the

long-lost son of Bronner (a former Amityville native), who slaughtered his entire family at Thanksgiving and married Keyes's mother before being apprehended. By the time of the art show, the mirror's influence has led Keyes to design a photographic performance-art piece based on Bronner's

Thanksgiving Day slaughter. First, Dick gets electrocuted in the basement by Suki's spirit. Then, history starts repeating itself as Keyes picks up a rifle and almost reenacts Bronner's Amityville murders. Instead, he shoots up the demonic looking-glass and shatters its malevolent curse.

Eschewing self-parody, AMITYVILLE: A NEW GENERATION presents its goblins with fresh victims to bedevil and plausibly establishes a connection between the current targets and the series' earlier casualties. The first AMITYVILLE flick was a hit way back in 1979; its appeal lay in fabricating a

satanic curse for a senseless crime that defied explanation. Intelligently, AMITYVILLE: A NEW GENERATION posits that a brutal crime has repercussions that could manifest themselves in the future. No matter who was responsible for the original evil, their violent act could take on a life of its

own. The problem with this new film is that its desire to play out its argument gets in the way of its thrills; it drifts into the Amityville past too often and for too long. Repositioning of these flashback scenes and sharper editing could have tightened suspense. With a shift of emphasis,

AMITYVILLE: A NEW GENERATION might have been an effective horror thriller. (Graphic violence, extensive nudity, profanity, adult situations.)

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  • Released: 1993
  • Rating: R
  • Review: AMITYVILLE: A NEW GENERATION tries scarily to bridge the gap between old, unspeakable evil and new terrors, but the house-haunting specters have lost their ability to chill anyone but a real estate agent with a property full of poltergeists to unload. In… (more)

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