A Crack In The Floor

  • 2001
  • 1 HR 30 MIN
  • R
  • Comedy, Horror

A fatuous funhouse of a movie, this tongue-in-cheek diversion was made to play drive-ins. Though the scares are lame and the humor is dumb and scatological, this unambitious picture is a tolerable time-waster. After witnessing the rape and murder of his mother, young Jeremiah (Kyle Patrick Feuer) grows up alone in mama's remote cabin. Driven mad by grief,...read more

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Reviewed by Robert Pardi
Rating:

A fatuous funhouse of a movie, this tongue-in-cheek diversion was made to play drive-ins. Though the scares are lame and the humor is dumb and scatological, this unambitious picture is a tolerable time-waster. After witnessing the rape and murder of his mother, young Jeremiah (Kyle Patrick Feuer) grows up alone in mama's remote cabin. Driven mad by grief, the adult Jeremiah (Rodger Hewlett) often hides in a sub-cellar, which affords a perfect view of his rustic home's first floor. Like others before them, two campers learn the fatal lesson that Jeremiah doesn't like company. After dredging the nearby reservoir, Sheriff Talmidge (Bo Hopkins) discovers dozens of vehicles; their registrations match the names of missing persons. Meanwhile, six wisecracking collegians enter Jeremiah's neck of the woods for their annual outdoor marijuana outing. Snooping about Jeremiah's sparsely decorated domicile, Sheriff Talmidge spots evidence of the last hikers who vanished without a trace; Jeremiah gives him a pitchforked reception. By the time the uninvited sextet crashes at chez Jeremiah for a night of ghost stories and pot smoking, Jeremiah is pretty riled up. He twists the neck of one young woman, then resorts to knife, animal trap and pick-axe to dispatch other guests. Eventually, sole survivor Lehman (Mario Lopez) convinces skeptical deputy Kevin (Stephen Saux) that there's a slaughterhouse in the forest. Filmmakers Sean Stanek and Corbin Timbrook try to make a pre-emptive strike against criticism of their film's baser instincts by nudging viewers in the ribs with a schlocky combination of gruesome chills and vulgar innuendo. The gore is toned down and many of the cornball guffaws are achieved at the expense of eccentric rustics who are in their own way as creepy as Jeremiah.

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