84 Charlie Mopic

  • 1989
  • 1 HR 35 MIN
  • R
  • War

Shot entirely in hand-held documentary style (an experiment tried before in the Vietnam segment of MORE AMERICAN GRAFFITI), 84 CHARLIE MOPIC follows a close-knit group of soldiers led by a taciturn black sergeant (Richard Brooks) as they "hump" through the brush in the Central Highlands of Viet Nam. On the relatively miniscule budget of $1 million, writer-director...read more

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Shot entirely in hand-held documentary style (an experiment tried before in the Vietnam segment of MORE AMERICAN GRAFFITI), 84 CHARLIE MOPIC follows a close-knit group of soldiers led by a taciturn black sergeant (Richard Brooks) as they "hump" through the brush in the Central Highlands

of Viet Nam. On the relatively miniscule budget of $1 million, writer-director Patrick Duncan, a Vietnam veteran who served as an infantryman for 13 months during 1968-69, shot this film in the hills outside Los Angeles using Super 16mm film stock, which was later blown up to 35mm for theatrical

release. The gimmick here--an entire movie seen through the eyes of an Army cameraman--works better than it has any right to, largely because Duncan creates a viable, realistic situation for its use. This method is fraught with peril for both director and actors, but when it works the sense of

realism lends an air of spontaneity and excitement to familiar material. While some may find the first half of the film boring, 84 CHARLIE MOPIC presents a fascinating and detailed account of what common infantrymen faced on a daily basis.

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  • Released: 1989
  • Rating: R
  • Review: Shot entirely in hand-held documentary style (an experiment tried before in the Vietnam segment of MORE AMERICAN GRAFFITI), 84 CHARLIE MOPIC follows a close-knit group of soldiers led by a taciturn black sergeant (Richard Brooks) as they "hump" through the… (more)

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