X

Join or Sign In

Sign in to customize your TV listings

Continue with Facebook Continue with email

By joining TV Guide, you agree to our Terms of Use and acknowledge the data practices in our Privacy Policy.

Look back at the shows that ended or were canceled this season

Shaun Harrison
01shows-lost-lost1.jpg
1 of 11 Mario Perez/ABC

01shows-lost-lost1

In a few short weeks, Lost's mind-bending, time-tripping, island-survival epic will sign off for good. Although we've had two and a half seasons to prepare for the goodbye, letting go of this truly revolutionary show won't be easy. Here are a few more shows we "lost" this season.
2 of 11 Kelsey McNeal/Fox

24

After eight really bad days, 24's clock will stop ticking. Like Lost, the show demanded the audience’s attention because of its serialized storytelling, and even though some of the once shocking plot twists felt recycled in later years, each season was its own ball of fun. There's already talk of a big-screen adventure for Jack Bauer, so all hope isn't lost.
3 of 11 Patrick Harbron/ABC

Ugly Betty

Despite a creatively renewed fourth season, ABC bounced Betty's time slot around, taking the show to record lows in the ratings. Luckily, the show was able to wrap up its stories before bowing out, moving Betty to London, where she took the next giant step in her career and was happy, with or without a man. (Though we like to think that dinner date she made with Daniel turned into something more serious.)
4 of 11 ABC

Eastwick

This adaptation of The Witches of Eastwick cast a spell on a certain sect of TV viewers, but it just didn't deliver enough eyeballs to convince ABC of its staying power. (It probably didn't help that the show followed the network's new comedy block, which is one of this season's biggest success stories.)
5 of 11 Sonja Flemming/CBS

Three Rivers

Although CBS was wise to find another vehicle for the rabid fans Alex O'Loughlin created with the also quickly canceled Moonlight, a show about organ transplants most certainly wasn't it. This medical drama was pulled off the schedule after only eight episodes. CBS will get another shot with O'Loughlin if its Hawaii Five-O reboot makes it onto the fall schedule.
6 of 11 Paul Drinkwater/NBC

The Tonight Show with Conan O'Brien

Easily the most talked-about story of this TV season. After a record-setting debut last June, Conan's dwindling numbers and Jay Leno's failure in prime time forced NBC executives to propose a new plan: Move Jay back to 11:35 and push Conan to past midnight. Conan didn't bite, instead handing The Tonight Show back to Jay and setting his sights on a new show on TBS.
7 of 11 Justin Lubin/NBC

Jay Leno Show

Jay may have lost this show (and some popularity points), but we're just happy to have our extra hour back in prime time.
8 of 11 Hopper Stone/USA Network

Monk

Tony Shaloub let go of his Emmy-winning character after eight seasons, and the quirky USA dramedy went out on top. The finale, which saw the obsessive-compulsive detective finally solve his wife's murder, drew 9.4 million viewers, setting the record as cable's most-watched hour of scripted programming ever.
9 of 11 Richard Foreman/Fox

Dollhouse

Though viewers and network executives seemed to want Joss Whedon's latest creation to work, it just never found its footing. Fox took a risk and ordered a second season, but poor Friday night ratings led the network to pull the show off the schedule during November sweeps. The remainder of the produced episodes aired in December and January.
10 of 11 Eric Heinila/TNT

Saving Grace

TNT, most likely caving to the expense of producing the show, decided to bring the spiritual explorations of Grace Hanadarko and her guardian angel Earl to an end after four seasons. Alongside Kyra Sedgwick on The Closer, Holly Hunter's character helped solidify the TNT brand.
11 of 11 Michael Becker/FX

Nip/Tuck

It's kind of a shock that this series made it to 100 episodes, especially when the show's boldness eventually turned to ridiculousness. Even so, spending an hour with Drs. Troy and McNamara was always entertaining, and during its prime, the show was routinely a ratings success for FX.