The Voice Episodes

2011, TV Show

The Voice Episode: "The Blind Auditions, Part 5"

Season 2, Episode 5
Episode Synopsis: Blind auditions continue.
Original Air Date: Feb 27, 2012

The Voice Episode Recap: This Is The Voice, Not The Harmonica Season 2, Episode 5

The blind auditions came to an end on Monday's episode of The Voice and they go out with one big chair-turner, a very disgruntled rapping opera singer and a surprising performance by one of the coaches. So who took the stage and got "down" with their team member? Which mentor got a little hot and bothered by one of the contestants? Let's get started:

Whitney Myer, 25, travels the country with her family performing original pop-soul-funk music, but she's ready to take her career to the next level. She picks a slightly more upbeat, and definitely more rock version of Alicia Keys' "No One" and she shows definite color in her voice. Her vocals get a little shaky towards the end, but she hits enough high notes to get all four coaches to turn around. Adam turns first, and he reminds her of that and states she could win the whole thing. Christina says Whitney made her forget that there was an Alicia Keys version and that she will give her time and attention and support. Blake says he loved seeing Whitney have fun on stage, and he's a fan no matter what. Whitney goes with Team Adam in what has got to be one of his biggest victories.

27-year-old David Dunn is the black sheep son who doesn't work for daddy's big Texas oil company. How rebellious! I've never heard of the tune "The Man Who Can't Be Moved," and David doesn't do much to make this tune memorable. He's like a weak version of Adam Levine crossed with Ray LaMontagne light. The judges have turned around for worse singers, but at this point in the competition it seems they want to hold out for a lot better. No one turns around and David's dad couldn't be happier to get his son back on the oil field.

My first thought for farmers-turned rockers The Shields Brothers: Why is that hair happening? Seriously. The boys come on big with the classic "Dancing with Myself" and sure, they have spunk, but the performance is too gritty and their electric guitars overpower everything else. I think they meant to audition for CBS' Rock Star? The song tricks Cee Lo into turning around and he automatically gets them all to himself.

From the first notes of "If I Were a Boy," Cheesa, 21, reminds me of Charlotte Sometimes, and that's not a compliment. She comes off too dramatic and you can hear her pushing every note so hard. Her high notes are too raw and jagged, but it just takes one decent run to get Cee Lo to turn around. She is all your's, pal.

Preston Shannon is 64 and his take on "In the Midnight Hour" drips with his age and experience. However, like The Shields Brothers, he relies too much on his electric guitar for a part of the process that is all about the voice. For his age, he should be able to bring more to the table and he goes home without a coach.

24-year-old Lex Land's soft and sultry performance of "I Can't Make You Love Me" sounds like garbled nonsense to me (did she swallow marbles right before going on stage?) but she gets Adam, Cee Lo and Blake to turn around shockingly fast. Too bad for them, since she gets real pitchy at the end and totally misses the pitch on the high notes. She's gonna need a lot of work, boys. Cee Lo is a big fan, and Adam says he heard some Sade in her voice. Blake likes what she can do with her lower register and tries his best to imitate her deep, drawn-out breaths — that is before he gets cut off by Adam. Burn!  She picks Blake's team anyways. He should moan like that every time he wants to win a singer over!

Cameron Novack, 28, is a self-proclaimed "jack of all genres" who raps about "Genie in a Bottle" one minute and sings opera the next. He seems too cocky and hams it up way too much for the camera. This feels like something ripped from Idol's bad auditions segment. He starts rapping on "You Oughta Know" before he busts out several high screeches. When Cameron fails to get the coaches to turn around, Adam is shocked by what he sees and asks "How are you not a woman?" Cameron raps to go out on his own terms and leaves Cee Lo regretting that he didn't press his button for "Novocain" when he could have. "Their loss for reals," Cameron tells his sister and mom backstage. Oy.

A bluesy, piano-tinged rendition of "Waiting on the World to Change" from Orlando Napier, 25, gets Adam to press his button almost immediately. With his controlled range and his skills on his piano — not to mention his noted stage presence, he's far from a front-runner but definitely has interesting chops to work with. Adam compliments Orlando's timing and tells him he's going to be awesome. Adam's team is now complete.

Lee Koch wants to be a musician who bakes and not a baker who pursues music, and takes the stage to sing Bob Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone." His sound is almost too distinctive yet completely boring and banal at the same time. (How is that possible?) He sounds like a poor man's Tony Lucca, but the minute he blows on his harmonica, Christina pounces but she's the only one. (Sadly — or not sadly — Adam has no more room! Drat!) Christina says the harmonica really sold it for her — to which I say, this is The Voice, not The Harmonica! She says she's worked with the best musicians in the world and is excited to help mold him.

Wade's "Rehab" is all over the place and he has poor tone, but his unique interpretation of the song gets Cee Lo to turn around. Not surprisingly, Cee Lo doesn't have to put up a fight for him, but he calls Wade's performance special. 

Adley Stump, 22, serves up a lot of flash but very little substance in her amateur performance of Carrie Underwood's "Last Name." She has powerful peeks in the song and is boiling over with energy, but she's far from consistent. It's enough to get Christina and Blake to push their buttons almost simultaneously right before the end of the song. Christina says she would help Adley dissect and improve her pipes, and jokingly argue that Blake is not a real vocalist. Blake also jokes that he's going to drown Christina when they go fishing (aw?) and argues it's about singing from the heart. Adley goes with her heart and picks Blake, completing his team.

Christina is the last one to fill her team, but Sera Hill makes it worth the wait with her smooth and soulful rendition of "I'm Going Down." She's not the best, but she's a lot more consistent and polished than most of the contestants tonight. Christina gets so into the song, she actually takes a microphone and duets with Sera for a few verses. And with that rousing performance, Christina's team is full and the blind auditions are dunzo!

So what did you think of the final blind auditions? Do you understand the appeal of the harmonica? Were you sad to see "Novocain" go home? Who are you pulling for in the battle rounds? Sound off below!

 

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The blind auditions came to an end on Monday's episode of The Voice and they go out with one big chair-turner, a very disgruntled rapping opera singer and a surprising performance by one of the coaches. So who took the stage and got "down" with their team member? Which mentor got a little hot and bothered by one of the contestants? Let's get started:

Whitney Myer, 25, travels the country with her family performing original pop-soul-funk music, but she's ready to take her career to the next level. She picks a slightly more upbeat, and definitely more rock version of Alicia Keys' "No One" and she shows definite color in her voice. Her vocals get a little shaky towards the end, but she hits enough high notes to get all four coaches to turn around. Adam turns first, and he... read more

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Premiered: April 26, 2011, on NBC
Rating: TV-PG
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Premise: Singers square off for a coveted recording contract in this reality talent contest from the producers of "Big Brother" and "Survivor." Four vocal coaches mentor the contestants in three distinct competition phases: the blind auditions (during which the coaches can't see a contestant and thereby judge them solely on their vocal talent); the battle phase (in which the contestants are advised and developed); and, lastly, the live-performance phase.

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