The Starter Wife Episodes

2007, TV Show

The Starter Wife Episode: "Hour 6"

Season 1, Episode 6
Episode Synopsis: Molly causes a blowup with Joan after reporting her rehab stunt to Pappy. Then she faces a difficult choice between Sam, who wants her back, and Lou, who wants to start a relationship. Meanwhile, problems with the divorce settlement drive Molly to find the strength to claim what's rightfully hers and take charge of her own life.
Original Air Date: Jun 28, 2007
Guest Cast Trilby Glover: Shoshanna Paul Gleeson: Aaron Barry Langrishe: Pappy Gigi Edgley: Chloe
Full Episode
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Season 1, Episode 6
Paid | VUDU
Length: 43:09
Aired: 6/28/2007

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June 28, 2007: The Starter Wife, Hour 6 Season 1, Episode 6

The final hour opened with Molly's Titanic fantasy, in which she was saying goodbye to Sam, the one she loved, and looking to be rescued by Lou, the stable one who could seemingly offer her everything she needed. Waking up, she whispered that she didn't need to analyze that dream too closely. Because, of course, she was looking to Lou to be her stable savior, while Sam was the one she lusted for. This final hour gave us a proper chick-lit ending. Molly rediscovered herself without the safety of male companionship, revived her creative career, savored her strong friendships, and waited until she was fully ready to be with Sam, who had finally rejoined the real world. But before we delve into the ending, let's reminisce about this final hour of The Starter Wife. I was thrilled that Kenny finally got what he deserved. Basically, his arrogance was eliminated, piece by piece, until he was just a humiliated fool. He let his house go to waste, his former assistant left him to work for Lou, Shoshanna laughed at the idea of him proposing to her, and he suffered the embarrassment of a five-hour state of physical excitement. I didn't understand why he called Molly of all people to come help him with his perpetual arousal. I guess he was used to her coming to his rescue. She came to his rescue in the middle of the night, muttering that he better be bleeding from the inside out. When she came into the hotel room and found him on the bed, I thought he was trying to seduce her, but his excitement (brought on by Viagra taken in a desperate attempt to bed Shoshanna) was a hilarious twist. Molly had played him, too, telling him that he should test Shoshanna's commitment to him (knowing full well that Shoshanna had no interest in him besides using him for a movie career). In a way, Molly helped lead Kenny to his embarrassing Viagra experience, and that was fun to see. Thank god Molly took him to the doctor, instead of helping him personally. It was heartbreaking to watch Joan and Molly fight. Joan felt betrayed that Molly called Pappy and told him about Joan's drinking and the car crash. It was the right thing to do, but Joan was unable see that at first. When she screamed that they would never be friends again, I knew it wasn't true, but I felt bad for them both. Molly was trying to do what was best, and Joan was trying to protect her marriage by hiding her problem. Pappy was such a good husband to Joan, though. He really seemed devoted to her. He drove her to AA and said he wasn't leaving the parking lot until she was finished. I would've liked to see more of Pappy. But at least Sam and Joan started bonding, out of the commonality of not feeling whole. I was glad that Sam could be there for Joan. Sam, for his part, really changed. I think he changed mostly out of love for Moly, but hopefully for his own sake, too. He came out of hiding and got back to the business of life. He bonded with all of Molly's friends, took the job that Aaron had offered him, and even wore a suit. He looked good in that suit, but did he buy it solely for the interview? Maybe he borrowed it from somebody. I wasn't sure how he could have afforded it. Anyway, he stepped back into the fold and set out to impress Molly. He found her on the beach (did anyone else notice that he removed his shirt just to go to the beach and see her?) and said that he wanted another chance to catch up with her. Molly was on the beach with Lou, who was wooing her with red-carpet premieres, club memberships, limousines and fancy dresses (by the way, must be nice to shop by having models parade dresses in front of you). But Molly did the right thing for herself and walked away, saying that she wasn't ready. I appreciate endings where the woman chooses herself first, and only then allows love into her life. Molly finally rediscovered her confidence and stopped letting people push her around. The satisfying climax was her standing up to the lawyers and to Kenny in the attorneys' meeting. She stood up and talked back to Kenny, ripping into him for throwing her away and taking her away from a former life where she was productive and sure of herself. She had returned to her old apartment, the one she lived in pre-Kenny, and realized what she had once been like. (I thought it was quite funny when Molly told the new resident of her old apartment to find herself before marrying any boyfriend.) She admitted that she'd been quiet for far too long, which was true. Demanding half of Kenny's money was what she needed to do. She was a good wife to him and a good mother to their child. At least Kenny wasn't obnoxious when he told her that he'd always known she was a good mother. He seemed genuine then. Molly ended her love affair with Lou and he took it well. She said goodbye, but he told her it wasn't goodbye, it was the start of a beautiful friendship (an appropriate Casablanca moment). I think they'll always be friends. They genuinely care for each other. Cricket took six pregnancy tests, all of them telling her that she was knocked up. When she said that the baby would replace the image of her husband cheating on her, didn't that seem strange? It didn't seem healthy. Did that mean she would forgive her husband out of love for the baby? I didn't buy it. And we only saw her husband once through the whole hour. He sort of disappeared. We didn't get to see her tell him that she was pregnant, either. That would've been a nice moment. I was glad that Molly walked away from Sam and Lou, bringing her daughter to visit Joan instead. I liked that Molly went to Joan for support and that Joan took her back. They needed to lean on each other. At Molly's birthday gathering, everyone gave her a meaningful present. Cricket asked Molly to be her daughter's godmother, to teach her daughter how to live life gracefully. Joan gave Molly her anniversary sober pin. Rodney and Lavender gave her an ugly statue. And Molly gave them all a present, a copy of her published children's book titled "Happy Waters," about a friendly shark, with special dedications for each of them. Molly announced that she was ready for a relationship. When they asked with whom, she blithely asked if anyone had seen Sam. Of course, they had all seen Sam. Before Sam could be with Molly, he had to bond with each of her friends and her daughter, and he seemed to do that by that end, once he let people in. In the last scene, Sam came to visit Molly and her daughter at the beach. Molly invited Sam for a swim, and they all went into the ocean, where Sam kissed Molly while holding her daughter. They were a peaceful, happy threesome. I enjoyed the ending. It was sweet, but I was left needing more. It was wrapped up too quickly for me. After six hours of clean summer fun, I wasn't ready to say goodbye to these characters. But I loved Molly's path to self-empowerment. Molly got the close friends, a fresh start, a revived career, a new house, a rediscovered confidence, and a man who changed his life for her. She got it all. show less
The final hour opened with Molly’s Titanic fantasy, in which she was saying goodbye to Sam, the one she loved, and looking to be rescued by Lou, the stable one who could seemingly offer her everything she needed. Waking up, she whispered that she didn’t need to analyze that dream too closely. Because, of course, she was looking to Lou to be her stable savior, while Sam was the one she lusted for. This final hour gave us a proper chick-lit ending. Molly rediscovered herself without the safety of male companionship, revived her creative career, savored her strong friendships, and waited until she was fully ready to be with Sam, who had finally rejoined the real world. But before we delve into the ending, let’s reminisce about this final hour of The Starter Wife. I was thrilled that Kenny finally got what he deserved. Basically, his arrogance was eliminated, piece by piece, until he was just a humiliated fool. He let his house go to waste, his former assistant left him t... read more

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Premiered: May 31, 2007, on USA
Rating: TV-14
User Rating: (127 ratings)
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Premise: Unexpectedly dumped by her movie-mogul husband of 10 years, Molly Kagen must reassess her life and her friends when she finds herself on the outside of the elite circles she once commanded.

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