Smallville Episodes

2006, TV Show

Smallville Episode: "Action"

Season 7, Episode 5
Episode Synopsis: Clark saves the life of a starlet (Christina Milian) on a film shoot in Smallville when a stunt car's brakes fail, but what happened was no accident. Meanwhile, Lionel finds himself the victim of a surprising captor.
Original Air Date: Oct 25, 2007
Guest Cast Christina Milian: Rachel Davenport Nancy Sivak Michael Cassidy: Grant Gabriel Christopher Jacot
Full Episode
click to playclick to play
Season 7, Episode 5
Paid | iTunes
Length: 41:36
Aired: 10/25/2007
Also available on Amazon Instant Video and VUDU
play more info

"Action" Season 7, Episode 5

"Who could resist the story of a small-town boy who grew up to save the world from the evil Devilicus?" Hardcore fans of the original comic book dissatisfied with changes in mythology, that's who. The opening shot of "Action" clues the audience in on the episode's running gag: The town of Smallville will serve as a set-within-a-set for "Warrior Angel," a film based upon the fictional version of the Superman of the Smallville universe. I have a feeling this is an episode the writers have been wanting to make for a long, long time. As Clark happens to be on hand for the shooting of "Warrior Angel," something goes horribly wrong. The lead actress' car's brakes give out and it strikes a fence, flipping over and sending her to an inevitable, fiery death - until Clark races in, grabs her and wins her undying affection. What is it with Clark and saving people from car accidents? But this was no accident! Someone tampered with her car, an attempt to force the filmmakers to adhere to "Warrior Angel" canon - this character was supposed to die at the hands of the hero's arch-nemesis, Devilicus, an act that forced him to accept his destiny to save mankind. Could this be an excuse for the writers to kill Lana off once and for all? The last time she "died," Clark was about to do just that.... Nah. It was just an excuse for the writers to poke fun at Smallville's rabid fans. "These blogs," Clark noted after discovering the possible identity of the attempted murderer, "these message boards and fan forums, they're all pretty extreme." Ouch. The bar for self-referential episodes of a popular TV show was set pretty high with Monk's "Mr. Monk and the TV Star," where the writers teased everything from the fan uprising against a new theme song to the unrealistic way the show portrayed police work. "Action" stuck more to mocking the nit-picking, obsessive nature of a fan base bent on preserving a mythology already distorted a million times over, which provided more than enough material. Both worked great, but the deciding factor? In Smallville the obsessed fan turned out to be the killer. In Monk the obsessed fan was played by Sarah Silverman. As much as I loved this episode and as much as I love Smallville as a whole, you just can't trump a guest appearance by Sarah Silverman. Meanwhile, we finally learn where Lionel's been - trapped inside a Stephen King novel. I just don't understand why Marilyn didn't hobble Lionel after his first escape attempt. I have no idea why Lana was behind this bizarre subplot; something to do with all the land that was bought up? Color me extreme, but I was kind of hoping we'd never find out. I know having the production assistant murder Lana was too heavily foreshadowed for it to actually happen but for a minute there, after she was thrown off the building... well. I was kind of hoping the next shot would be Clark peering over the ledge, a horrified expression on his face the only sign that this time he'd been too late. Instead, he (apparently) learned how to use his power of flight to save her. I can live with that. For now. As much as the episode gently mocked the show's more, ah, dedicated fans, it also paid more tribute to the mythology of Superman than it has in a long while. Lana (!) said it best, when telling Clark that he might be better off without her. "He just needed hope. Millions of people look up to Warrior Angel, maybe they could look up to you instead.... One day, the world will need you more than I do, and I don't want to be the one holding you [back]." Clark naturally chose Lana and the farm over his true destiny, a decision illustrated beautifully by the poignant closing shot: Clark hanging the cape over a fence post, walking away toward the farmhouse as the camera pulls out to show the cape, his future, billowing precariously in the wind. PS. Was I the only one who thought it funny that the network chose this episode to launch an ad campaign for the "Smallville Blogger Competition"? To see more about Smallville, including videos and potential spoilers, visit our Online Video Guide. show less
"Who could resist the story of a small-town boy who grew up to save the world from the evil Devilicus?"Hardcore fans of the original comic book dissatisfied with changes in mythology, that's who.The opening shot of "Action" clues the audience in on the episode's running gag: The town of Smallville will serve as a set-within-a-set for "Warrior Angel," a film based upon the fictional version of the Superman of the Smallville universe. I have a feeling this is an episode the writers have been wanting to make for a long, long time.As Clark happens to be on hand for the shooting of "Warrior Angel," something goes horribly wrong. The lead actress' car's brakes give out and it strikes a fence, flipping over and sending her to an inevitable, fiery death — until Clark races in, grabs her and wins her undying affection. What is it with Clark and saving people from car accidents?But this was no accident! Someone tampered with her car, an attempt to force the filmmakers to adhere to "Warri... read more

Related Links

Other Links:
Smallville

Are You Watching?

Loading ...
Premiered: September 21, 2006, on CW
Rating: TV-PG
User Rating: (3,278 ratings)
Add Your Rating: 1 stars2 stars3 stars4 stars5 stars
Premise: Superman's teen years as Clark Kent find him agonizing over his shy, uncertain persona while dealing with his evolving powers and an infatuation with classmate Lana Lang. Crisply paced and cast with appealing performers, `Smallville' is not at all campy and is often surprisingly moving as a conventional coming-of-age drama; it succeeds in adding creative twists to the young hero's life without compromising the adult pop icon's legend.

Cast

Shop

Mapping Smallville: Critical Essays on the Series and Its Characters
Buy Mapping Smallville: Critical Essays on the Series and Its Characters from Amazon.com
From McFarland (Paperback)
Usually ships in 24 hours
Buy New: $38.00 (as of 12:24 AM EST - more info)
Smallville: Season 3
Buy Smallville: Season 3 from Amazon.com
From Warner Home Video (DVD)
Usually ships in 24 hours
Buy New: $29.69 (as of 12:24 AM EST - more info)

More Products

TV GUIDE Users' Most Popular