Sanford and Son

1972, TV Show

News

King of the Hill Actor Dennis Burkley Dies at 67

Dennis Burkley (right) with Will Smith in an episode of The Fresh Prince of Bel Air

Character actor Dennis Burkley, who starred in My Name is Earl and most recently did voice work on King of the Hill, died at his home in Sherman Oaks, Calif. over the weekend, CNN reports. He was 67.

read more

Three's Company Producer George Burditt Dies at 89

Emmy-nominated writer-producer George Burditt died Tuesday in Burbank, Deadline reports. He was 89. read more

Jeffersons and Silver Spoons Director Jack Shea dies at 84

Jack Shea

Inveterate TV sitcom director and Directors Guild of America chief Jack Shea died on Sunday in Los Angeles at age 84.

read more

NewsRadio, Blu Brothers and Other Announced Releases

News Radio courtesy Sony Pictures

New releases announced today, August 4:Band of Brothers (Blu-ray Disc) will be coming out November 11 Good Times - The Complete Series will be coming out October 28 NewsRadio - The Complete Series will be coming out October 28 Rules of Engagement - The Complete 2nd Season will be coming out October 14 Sanford and Son - The Complete Series will be coming out October 28 Visit TVShowsOnDVD.com for the complete stories on these and other news items. read more

I love how much you ...

Question: I love how much you appreciate TV from a variety of cultures. Thanks to the Internet, viewers are finally figuring out just how often the U.K. and the U.S. "borrow" show ideas from each other. But outside of reality and sketch shows, how often does this actually work? There is usually a great deal of buzz surrounding Americanized British shows, especially from the fans of the original. Yet when the show finally debuts, there is a sigh of disappointment from critics and fans alike. The Office is the only show I am aware of that has avoided this curse. Should the networks take a chance and try showing the original British versions? Financially, this would be a goldmine for them and for the original British companies as well. The U.K. broadcasts American shows like Heroes, Dexter, House, CSI, Grey's Anatomy and Desperate Housewives, so why don't we return the favor? Most Americans don't seem to know that BBC America exists (unless they read your column) and have no other way to ... read more

Jericho Exec Balances Good and Bad News

Skeet Ulrich, Jericho

The new CBS drama Jericho has a good-news/bad-news message. The good news is that you can survive a nuclear attack. The bad news is it’s not a lot of fun afterwards. But the whole “what if” nature of Jericho — set in a small town that is cut off from the rest of the world after a nuclear strike — is what makes it one of the more intriguing concepts of the new season. The Biz talked to executive producer Jon Turteltaub about why he thinks it’s the right time to go nuclear in prime time.TVGuide.com: A lot of people are going to compare this show to the 1983 TV-movie The Day After, which was also about how a nuclear attack affects a Kansas town. Jon Turteltaub: The main difference is we’re not doing a show about people walking around with their hair falling out. It’s about what you do when you survive it. It could be any place that gets cut off. read more

Do you remember a show with, ...

Kene Holliday and Victor French, Carter Country

Question: Do you remember a show with, I think, the guy from Highway to Heaven and a black actor that was sort of a comedy version of In the Heat of the Night? It's driving me nuts.


Answer: Yes.

Aaaah, you didn't really think I was gonna stop at being a wiseacre and answer your question with one word, did you? You'll never so easily curb my urge to babble, Joon.

Funny you use the word "nuts," since the show in question, ABC's Carter Country, bore the name of former peanut farmer Jimmy Carter, who was president at the time it debuted in September 1977. As you say, it bore a strong resemblance to In the Heat of the Night, which 10 years later would be a hit TV series itself.

read more

Help me out here. I'm a big ...

Clockwise (from left): Isabel Sanford, Franklin Cover, Roxie Roker, Sherman Hemsley, The Jeffersons

Question: Help me out here. I'm a big fan of The Jeffersons and I always thought the first actor who played Lionel left because of a swelled head, then came back when his solo career didn't take off. But my brother insists it was so that his brother could take over. Who's right?


Answer: Why, you are, Brenda, assuming you mean Mike Evans, who played young Lionel Jefferson on All in the Family and then on its Jeffersons spin-off. He left because of an inflated sense of self rather than a bump on the noggin. However, it's probably nicer to say he suffered from the inexperience of youth rather than to tar him with the ego brush. Of course, the actor himself took it a step further in 1980 and told TV Guide he was dar read more

RIP

Comedy legend Richard Pryor died of a heart attack Saturday morning at a Los Angeles hospital. He was 65. Pryor, who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1986, first gained fame as a profane stand-up performer whose edgy, freewheeling style and personal take on racial inequality influenced an entire generation of comedians, including Eddie Murphy, Chris Rock and Robin Williams. In the '70s and '80s, he starred in hit films such as Stir Crazy and Silver Streak in addition to writing for TV shows and movies like Sanford and Son and Blazing Saddles. In the early '80s, he also battled drug addiction, which he referenced onstage and in his autobiographical film, Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life Is Calling. read more

R.P., R.I.P.

Richard Pryor

Comedy legend Richard Pryor died of a heart attack Saturday morning at a Los Angeles hospital, the Associated Press reports. The ground-breaking comic and actor was 65 and had been ill with multiple sclerosis (MS), a degenerative disease of the nervous system, for years. Pryor first gained fame as a profane standup performer whose edgy, free-wheeling style and personal take on racial inequality was an influence on an entire generation of comedians, including Eddie Murphy, Chris Rock and Robin Williams. In the 1970s and '80s, he starred in hit films such as Stir Crazy and Silver Streak in addition to writing for TV shows and movies like Sanford and Son and Blazing Saddles. In the early 1980's, he also battled drug addiction, which he referenced on stage and in his autobiographical film, Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life Is Calling. He was diagnosed with MS in the 1990's read more

Are You Watching?

Loading ...
Premiered: January 14, 1972, on NBC
Rating: TV-PG
User Rating: (89 ratings)
Add Your Rating: 1 stars2 stars3 stars4 stars5 stars
Premise: L.A. junk dealer Fred Sanford was Norman Lear's black counterpart to Archie Bunker. The gravel-voiced widower hurled outrageous one-liners at his Bible-toting sister-in-law, Esther; cooked up get-rich-quick schemes with buddies Grady (who got his own spin-off series in 1975) and Bubba; and feigned countless `big ones' (heart attacks) to win the sympathy of long-suffering son Lamont. Based on the British series `Steptoe and Son,' the show consistently ranked in the Top 10.

Cast

Shop

Sanford and Son : Fan Favorites
Buy Sanford and Son : Fan Favorites from Amazon.com
From Sony Pictures Home Entertainment (DVD)
Usually ships in 24 hours
Buy New: $8.99 (as of 12:17 AM EST - more info)
Sanford and Son: The Complete Series (Slim Packaging)
Buy Sanford and Son: The Complete Series (Slim Packaging) from Amazon.com
From Sony Pictures Home Entertainment (DVD)
Usually ships in 24 hours
Buy New: $30.49 (as of 12:17 AM EST - more info)

More Products

TV GUIDE Users' Most Popular