Meet the Press

1947, TV Show

News

Who Will Be Russert's Successor?

Tom Brokaw by Ali Goldstein/NBC

Executives at NBC News are still reeling over the death of friend and colleague Tim Russert. But soon they will have to come up with a plan about how to proceed with their coverage of the 2008 Presidential campaign, which includes picking Russert's successor at Meet the Press. While we believe there are only two real candidates for the job, here's what we think about all the names that have been thrown out there.
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Tim Russert Remembered on Meet the Press

After the sudden and tragic death of famed political analyst Tim Russert, NBC went forward with a Tom Brokaw-hosted, special edition of Meet the Press which paid tribute to his "beloved colleague." The emotional episode filmed as Russert's moderator chair stood empty in remembrance of his extraordinary life and career. apparent heart attack. Russert's son, Luke, was also on the Today show this morning expressing his appreciation to the outpouring of support from the NBC family as he and his mother are taking everything "day by day" during this difficult time.Related:• Meet the Press' Tim Russert Dead at 58• Matt Roush Remembers TV's Political Enthusiast• TV Guide's Last Interview with Tim Russert read more

Brokaw Tributes Russert on Sunday's Meet the Press

Tom Brokaw courtesy NBC

As the broadcast news community and its audience still reels from the news of Tim Russert's passing, NBC has decided to broadcast this Sunday a special, Tom Brokaw-hosted edition of Meet the Press, celebrating the political analyst's extraordinary life and career."Tim was a man of many passions — his family most of all, his faith, his country, political journalism, baseball and the Buffalo Bills," Brokaw shares in a statement. "As a working class Irish-American with a Jesuit education his range was wide and deep — from the sensibilities of blue-collar voters to the politics of the Vatican, from the power plays on Capitol Hill to the power plays on network television. Almost all of our conversations — and they went on every day — ended with some version of, 'Can you believe how lucky we are to be doing this?'"Brokaw is the one who broke into Friday-afternoon programming to report the sudden passing of the NBC family's "beloved colleague."In most markets, Meet the ... read more

Remembering Tim Russert, TV's Political Enthusiast

Tim Russert by Virginia Sherwood/MSNBC Photo

The sudden and shocking death on Friday at 58 of Tim Russert, NBC’s Washington bureau chief and since 1991 the famously tenacious moderator of Sunday morning’s iconic Meet the Press, leaves a tremendous void in TV’s political landscape during one of the most historic presidential contests ever. Few figures have loomed as large during political seasons in the modern TV era as Russert, with his brash and infectious enthusiasm for politics, his dogged interrogation techniques and, as NBC anchor Brian Williams noted affectionately (from Afghanistan, where he’s on assignment), his “aggressively unfancy” manner.TV Guide once selected Russert’s use of a white eraser board on 2000’s historic and inconclusive presidential election night, brandishing the words “Florida Florida Florida” in a low-tech display of uncanny foresight, as one of the “100 Most Memorable TV Moments” in TV history. Time Magazine recently named him one of the 1... read more

Meet the Press' Tim Russert Dead at 58

Tim Russert by Virginia Sherwood/MSNBC Photo

Tim Russert died on Friday of an apparent heart attack after collapsing at NBC's Washington bureau, where he was recording voiceovers for this weekend's Meet the Press. He was 58.In reporting on-air on the passing of his "beloved colleague," Tom Brokaw said, "This news division will not be the same without his strong, clear voice." Added Brian Williams in a Friday MSNBC newscast, "[Tim] was as addicted to his work as anyone I know. It was his life's love." Russert — NBC News' senior vice president and Washington bureau chief — among his other accomplishments had moderated Meet the Press since December 1991. Meet the Press is the longest-running program on network television, having made its NBC-TV debut on November 6, 1947. Russert served as Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan's chief-of-staff and former New York Governor Mario Cuomo's press secretary before crossing over into journalism and joining NBC News in 1984. In remembering Russert, NBC News' chief foreign affairs corresp... read more

Cheers: Tim Russert's Full-court Press

Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama andTim Russert courtesy NBC

Cheers to Tim Russert for pressing the issues at the Democratic debate in Ohio. Despite Hillary Clinton's invocation of a Saturday Night Live sketch suggesting that the media is "in the tank" for Barack Obama, the MSNBC moderator was equally tough on both contenders about issues ranging from NAFTA to Rev. Louis Farrakhan. As he does so skillfully on Meet the Press, Russert quoted the senators' own words back to them in an attempt to pin down their positions. Such pointed, informed questioning explains why Russert bestrides the political-talk arena like a colossus. read more

Meet the Dad Tim Russert on being a good son - and a good presidential candidate

Tim Russert, Meet the Press

Father's Day is coming up, which means it's almost time for another book royalty check for NBC's Meet the Press anchor, Tim Russert. Russert's memoir about his father, Big Russ and Me: Father and Son — Lessons of Life was not just a best-seller in 2004; it generated 60,000 pieces of mail from readers wanting to share stories about their dads (or father figures). Last year, Russert compiled the most compelling stories in a second book, Wisdom of Our Fathers: Lessons and Letters from Daughters and Sons, which is now out in paperback. Meanwhile, Meet the Press has begun its "Meet the Candidates" series, which is must-see viewing for political junkies. The Biz recently caught up with Russert to talk pops and pols. TVGuide.com: After you wrote a book about your dad and a follow-up, is the bar now too high for you read more

What's the Secret to Blockbuster Success?

What, if anything, do Star Wars, Mission: Impossible, and Jaws have in common?

What is the formula for blockbuster-movie success? And how does it differ from the recipe for disaster? Boffo! Tinseltown's Bombs and Blockbusters, an HBO documentary premiering tonight at 9 pm/ET — and based on the new book Boffo! How I Learned to Love the Blockbuster and Fear the Bomb, by Variety editor-in-chief and former studio exec Peter Bart — explores those much-asked questions by way of A-list talking heads and fantastic clips from films both great and... so-so. Bart says that  — especially as cohost of AMC's Sunday Morn read more

What's the Secret to Blockbuster Success?

What, if anything, do Star Wars, Mission: Impossible, and Jaws have in common?

What is the formula for blockbuster-movie success? And how does it differ from the recipe for disaster? The new book Boffo! How I Learned to Love the Blockbuster and Fear the Bomb, by Variety editor-in-chief and former studio exec Peter Bart, explores those much-asked questions, as does an accompanying HBO documentary, Boffo! Tinseltown's Bombs and Blockbusters, premiering June 29 and featuring almost as many A-list talking heads as fantastic clips from films both great and... so-so. Bart says that  — especially as cohost of AMC's Sunday read more

Bill Maher Is the Real Deal

Real Time with Bill Maher

As HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher debates the issues for one last time (Friday at 11 pm/ET) before going on hiatus — fret not, the series is expected to return in late summer — we asked host Bill Maher about his show and the state of the union.

TV Guide: You're so informed. How do you prepare for a show?
Bill Maher:
Well, I spend all week preparing. People are always surprised to hear that I work a lot harder on this show than when I had an everyday show [Politically Incorrect]. When you do an everyday show, you read more

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Premiered: November 06, 1947, on NBC
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Premise: This Sunday-morning public-affairs institution is network TV's oldest program, but it's certainly no dinosaur as it continues to be a prime forum for newsmakers (domestic and foreign) wanting to make announcements or test political waters. The series, in which guests are questioned by the moderator and a panel of journalists, began its life in prime time in November 1947.

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