It's Always Sunny in... Episodes

2005, TV Show

It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia Episode: "The Gang Gets Invincible"

Season 3, Episode 2
Episode Synopsis: Mac, Dennis and Dee try out for the Philadelphia Eagles, but seem more interested in outdoing each other. Also trying out for the team is Doyle McPoyle, a brother of the gang's archenemies, Ryan and Liam McPoyle. The entire McPoyle clan shows up to cheer Doyle on, which is not good news for fellow tailgaters Frank and Charlie.
Original Air Date: Sep 13, 2007
Guest Cast Jimmi Simpson: Liam McPoyle Geoffrey Owens: McNabb Imposter Faizon Love: Coach Nate Mooney: Ryan McPoyle
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Season 3, Episode 2
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Length: 22:07
Aired: 9/13/2007
Also available on Amazon Prime and VUDU
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The Gang Finds a Dumpster Baby/The Gang Gets Invincible Season 3, Episode 2

The Gang Finds a Dumpster Baby It's good to have Sunny back for a third season and in fine form with the premiere episode. To help you get further in the mood for the new season, check out Anthony Layser's interview with Rob McElhenney. Thanks to Dennis ( Glenn Howerton) being inspired by An Inconvenient Truth, the whole gang tries to do good in their own way, yet somehow no good comes of it: a revenge plan (involving sex, drugs and a bulldozed tree), a kidnapping and baby painting. This wasn't what Al Gore intended. I thought Dee ( Kaitlin Olson) and Mac's part of the story was the best and funniest. As much as they wanted to take care of DB, that desire pretty much ended as soon as he (was it a "he"? Dumpster Baby is one of those gender-neutral names that are all the rage) let out his first cry, turning Mac into a stereotypical nightmare dad. He just wants beer in the fridge and for Dee to keep the kid quiet. But just when it looked bleakest for DB as they eyed a trash can with intentions of returning him where they found him, some strangers remark how cute he is and give Dee and Mac the proper motivation to help the baby: He could be a star! One of my favorite moments of the episode was Dee and Mac trying to convince the agent that DB could in fact pass for Mexican, especially if he wore a hat full of nachos and cheese dip (I swear I came up with that nacho hat invention with my buddy Mark! Not for kids, though. We also came up with a nacho bandolier to go with it. I believe our brief nacho-inspired invention spurt was helped along by beer consumption.) But the best part came with their attempts to figure out how to make DB's skin darker since Latino babies are hot: tanning (with Dee's great line to the pumpkin-colored salon worker: "The road to stardom is paved with hard knocks and orange a--holes"), painting and shoe polish. In their defense, the shoe polish did work for Gene Wilder in Silver Streak. Charlie ( Charlie Day) and Frank ( Danny DeVito) had a solid storyline with their addiction to "sweet, sweet trash." Though I thought it got a little weird at times with how obsessed they became. I thought Charlie gave us the best moment - seeing him find that huge "Ali Baba" sword and come running down that hill of trash was well done. And though we didn't learn if Frank is really Charlie's father (not sure who's lying, Frank or Charlie's mom), we did learn some helpful hints about trash: " A broken boom box: "Put this thing in a plastic bag and boom, shower radio, buddy." " A strip of paper: "You could wrap stuff with it!" " Another coat: "To protect your other coat!" And with that last one, Charlie unlocks the mystery of why many people living on the street wear multiple coats - a constant desire to protect their outer coat. Thanks, Charlie! I think I liked Dennis' storyline the least because it was the most predictable. You knew as soon as Sage the Hippie trashed him that Dennis would have his revenge. It was still fun to watch, for the most part. Though I don't think I will ever erase the image of Dennis' "O" face when he's with Sage's girl Ariel. And it all gets wrapped up with that great last scene that looks like some sort of strange ritualistic sacrifice to the child-services people, but it's really just a couple of friends getting together to paint a baby while the others wrestle over an Ali Baba sword above them. Good, clean fun. The Gang Gets Invincible For the second of the back-to-back new episodes, the gang is once again inspired by a movie. This time it's Invincible. When they learn the Philadelphia Eagles are having open tryouts, just like the movie, Mac and Dennis realize it's something they have to do, and Dee gets involved, too (in hopes of proving to the guys that women can play other sports besides "cooking" and "complaining to their friends about their boyfriends"). I have to say I wasn't a huge fan of this episode. It had its moments, but it wasn't up to their usual quality, and I hope this doesn't hurt the show in the long run. It looks like it's finally getting the big push in the media that it deserves (I've seen more articles and interviews with the cast than I ever remember seeing before). With the added attention, they're going to have more people tuning in to check it out, and if they hope to keep them tuning in, they'll need to hit them with their best stuff. It started off promisingly enough with a Charlie freak-out. I am a sucker for every time he gets so frustrated that he just starts yelling incoherently. Always cracks me up. This time he's frustrated by the gang having an in-depth discussion about a mouse fighting a scorpion. When he convinces them to leave the bar booth and get some fresh air outside, the next shot of them, at a similar table, with another line of beers in front of them is fantastic. But their enjoyment of the outdoors and the people around them doesn't last long. Soon enough they're clamoring for the isolation of the bar, with my favorite line coming from Mac: "It's like there's no room to drink!" I liked the scenes with Mac, Dennis and Dee trying out for the Eagles, with these being the highlights for me: The visit from Donovan McNabb, who turned out to be an imposter and spokesman from McDonald's; Mac's tackle dance; and Dennis' hatred of tackling ("Hittin's not really my thing, coach"), and love of thinking about how well he runs out for a catch (resulting in him not paying attention and getting knocked out by the ball). I also thought Faizon Love did a great job as the coach who oviously was assigned to these tryouts against his will ("We're doing these tryouts for you because of your harassment and your love for the New Kids on the Block movie!"). It was the Frank and Charlie scenes that dragged the episode down for me. They take too much acid and start freaking out - I mean, haven't we seen this before on other shows and movies? Weird camera effects and everything? Fred Savage directed this one and maybe he needed to add "Skilled with all acid-trip-simulating camera lenses" to his résumé. I will say this for Fred: that scene where the McPoyle family pours out of the RV would make David Lynch proud. It was like the end of the State Room scene in A Night at the Opera mixed with Freaks ( Silver Streak and now this. Who says I can't make timely references?). I'm sure the next episode will rebound so they can keep building on their growing popularity. If you're one of the people tuning in for the first time and had a similar reaction, hang in there. Also, do yourself a favor and pick up the recently released first two seasons on DVD. You'll enjoy them, and I promise I am not a paid spokesperson like Donovan McNabb is for McDonald's. Take care and hope to see you next week. For more Sunny clips, visit our Online Video Guide. show less
The Gang Finds a Dumpster BabyIt’s good to have Sunny back for a third season and in fine form with the premiere episode. To help you get further in the mood for the new season, check out Anthony Layser’s interview with Rob McElhenney. Thanks to Dennis (Glenn Howerton) being inspired by An Inconvenient Truth, the whole gang tries to do good in their own way, yet somehow no good comes of it: a revenge plan (involving sex, drugs and a bulldozed tree), a kidnapping and baby painting. This wasn't what Al Gore intended.I thought Dee (Kaitlin Olson) and Mac’s part of the story was the best and funniest. As much as they wanted to take care of DB, that desire pretty much ended as soon as he (was it a "he"? Dumpster Baby is one of those gender-neutral names that are all the rage) let out his first cry, turning Mac into a stereotypical nightmare dad. He just wants beer in the fridge and for Dee to keep the kid quiet. But just when it looked bleakest for DB as they eyed a trash ... read more

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Premiered: August 04, 2005, on FX
Rating: TV-MA
User Rating: (615 ratings)
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Premise: Seriously dark comedy about four dissolute friends who run a struggling pub in Philadelphia. Dennis, Dee, Mac and Charlie are absolutely (even gleefully) amoral. They're 'Seinfeld' characters on steroids, clowning their way through story lines that 'Seinfeld' writers wouldn't have touched.

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