It's Always Sunny in... Episodes

2005, TV Show

It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia Episode: "Dennis Looks Like a Registered Sex Offender"

Season 3, Episode 11
Episode Synopsis: Dennis is mistaken for a recently released child molester; Mac tries to bond with his ex-con father, who can't take his eyes off a creeped-out Dee; and Frank moves out of the apartment he's been sharing with Charlie, and moves in with Charlie's mother.
Original Air Date: Oct 25, 2007
Guest Cast Gregory Scott Cummins: Luther Gary Kraus: Angry Dad
Full Episode
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Season 3, Episode 11
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Length: 22:25
Aired: 10/25/2007
Also available on iTunes, Amazon Prime and VUDU
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"Dennis Looks Like a Registered Sex Offender" Season 3, Episode 11

Wow. This was one of Sunny's saddest, most dysfunctional episodes yet. And it had nothing to do with the fact that Dennis was being mistaken for a sex offender. That was actually the lighter part of the storyline, I thought. I know it's being played for laughs, but it's tough not to feel sorry for Charlie and Mac and how much they each want a father figure. But let's get on to the fun! So it starts off with the gang having some innocent fun as Mac videotapes Charlie trying to set the world's record for holding his breath. I thought the best part about the opening scene was seeing how much physical discomfort Charlie experiences when he has to listen to someone speak for a long period of time. As the woman explains why she's handing out fliers about the sex offender who has moved into the neighbor (and is a chubby ringer for Dennis), Charlie is literally squirming and pleading with her to wrap it up. Besides Dennis' problem of looking like the sex offender, a couple of other problems arise: Charlie is losing Frank because he needs to leave to find a woman. (I won't even use his exact term, but I'll just say personality is not high on his list of what he wants in a woman. Even worse, the woman he's leaving for is Charlie's mom.) Meanwhile, Mac gets a surprise visit from his dad, who has been paroled from prison. Watching these guys try so hard to please dads who seemingly do not care at all for them is so painful, yet so funny. And I guess these kinds of painfully funny situations are what this show is all about. After a little break, I suppose we were due for a shirtless Dennis scene. It's a shame the streak had to be broken, but you knew it couldn't last forever. At least the scene where Dee sets him up for revenge was hilarious, as he believes she's trying to help him dispel any notion that he could be a sex offender. Somehow the plan to run around shirtless (while wearing an awful, awful mustache) at a playground and get kids to take part in physical-fitness stretches seemed like such a good, kindhearted idea at the start. Unfortunately, the children's parents didn't feel the same way. Eventually they realize the only solution is to get the sex offender out of the neighborhood, and they accomplish this with a young boy they've trained to say completely disturbing things about him in a court of law. The offender gets the idea and agrees, and one of the creepiest moments (besides what they have the boy say) in an all-around creepy episode is the quick wink he gives the kid before shutting the door. Then there are Mac and Charlie's attempts to gain the affections of their respective fathers. Did I mention how uncomfortable it was? They decide to plan a dinner party for all of them, with booze being the key ingredient: It will make Charlie's mom so belligerent that she'll leave Frank and force him to stay with Charlie again, and it'll make Luther, Mac's father, so drunk that he'll be willing to sleep with the mother again. I'd like to stop at this point and say that Mac's mom is one of the vilest yet most familiar characters I've seen. She sits there smoking cigarette after cigarette while wanting nothing more than to just be left alone to watch TV. I swear I remember my older relatives having friends like this when I was growing up. They scared me. My favorite moment in the episode was when Charlie plans to steal wine for the party. It seems pretty straightforward to him: Empty some spaghetti-sauce jars, poke holes in the wine box (Charlie only steals the good stuff) and fill the jars, then steal the jars. When Mac points out it would have been easier to steal the box itself rather than several jars, Charlie starts to defend himself, then yells, "You know what? Where were you 10 minutes ago when I was coming up with this plan, man?" It's when the dinner party starts that the grayness begins. And I use this term because not only is nothing sunny in this part of Philadelphia, this is also the appropriate color of the table scene: Everyone's plates are full of a gray, casserole-type substance, the pitcher on the table has a gray liquid in it (turkey sangria. Consider it when you're wondering what to do with your Thanksgiving leftovers), and Mac's mom keeps billowing her gray smoke. The plan (to break up Charlie's mom and Frank and to bring Mac's parents together) is only partially and unexpectedly successful. In the end, Mac and Charlie have their own separate, desperate rants about how much they want their respective dads to want them, and Luther and Charlie's mom wind up getting together. The final scene was probably as close as this show will ever come to having a "sweet" ending, and it was pretty heartbreaking. Even though Luther gets arrested before he can take Charlie and Mac to Cooperstown, the fact that he even wanted to is a nice moment, as you see Mac so relieved to finally get the love he's wanted from his dad. But of course that all gets erased as Luther now wants to kill him for turning him in, and that was really the perfect ending. How weird would it have been to have an episode end happily, right? For more Sunny clips, visit our Online Video Guide. show less
Wow. This was one of Sunny's saddest, most dysfunctional episodes yet. And it had nothing to do with the fact that Dennis was being mistaken for a sex offender. That was actually the lighter part of the storyline, I thought. I know it’s being played for laughs, but it’s tough not to feel sorry for Charlie and Mac and how much they each want a father figure. But let's get on to the fun!So it starts off with the gang having some innocent fun as Mac videotapes Charlie trying to set the world’s record for holding his breath. I thought the best part about the opening scene was seeing how much physical discomfort Charlie experiences when he has to listen to someone speak for a long period of time. As the woman explains why she’s handing out fliers about the sex offender who has moved into the neighbor (and is a chubby ringer for Dennis), Charlie is literally squirming and pleading with her to wrap it up. Besides Dennis’ problem of looking like the sex offender, a ... read more

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Premiered: August 04, 2005, on FX
Rating: TV-MA
User Rating: (615 ratings)
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Premise: Seriously dark comedy about four dissolute friends who run a struggling pub in Philadelphia. Dennis, Dee, Mac and Charlie are absolutely (even gleefully) amoral. They're 'Seinfeld' characters on steroids, clowning their way through story lines that 'Seinfeld' writers wouldn't have touched.

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