Fringe

2008, TV Show

Fringe Episode: "The Bishop Revival"

Season 2, Episode 14
Episode Synopsis: The Division discovers that the bizarre deaths of guests at a Massachusetts wedding were the result of a test for chemical weaponry, but the investigation also reveals evidence that the case may have genealogical ties to Walter.
Original Air Date: Jan 28, 2010
Guest Cast Aaron Brooks: Josh Staller Alberta Mayne: Young Mother Magda Harout: Nana Staller Nancy Linari: Eliza Staller Sierra Pitkin: Jordan Leonard Tenisci: Harry Staller Dan Joffre: Det. Manning Craig Robert Young: Alfred Hoffman
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Season 2, Episode 14
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Length: 43:54
Aired: 1/28/2010
Also available on Amazon Prime and VUDU
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Fringe Episode Recap: "The Bishop Revival" Season 2, Episode 14

The team investigates a wedding where the groom and all of his blood relatives have suffocated to death. They soon realize that not only does the killer have ties to the Nazis, but he also has a connection to Walter's father.

At the end of last week's recap I said that I was worried about this episode of Fringe after having seen the preview. To use Nazis as a villain these days tends to indicate a lack of originality — they've been used for 60 years now as the boilerplate villain in a lot of popular culture. Luckily, "The Bishop Revival" was not the episode I worried it would be, though that doesn't necessarily mean it was all that great either.

After Walter investigates the toxin used in the wedding from hell, he realizes that it's designed to kill people with a certain genetic characteristic. Following another attack at a coffee shop he realizes that that genetic characteristic is customizable — the killer can design the toxin to kill, say, people with brown eyes or black hair or people of certain races. He also realizes that the killer has left a signature in the toxin: a seahorse, which, as it turns out, is his father's signature.

Walter reveals that his father, Robert, was a scientist working for the Nazis, while also being a spy for the Allies. He got his messages to the Allies through his books, which Walter thinks he still has until Peter reveals he sold them for money a few years back. This causes Walter to get mad ... really mad. This is the first time I can recall that Walter got genuinely upset with Peter. But it makes sense, Walter has always been very protective of his family, even his extended FBI family (which, if his hinting to Peter at the beginning is any indication, he's hoping to turn into his immediate family), so selling his father's possessions qualifies as an especially egregious offense.

I like that Olivia didn't let Peter get away with his excuse of selling the books for money, she knows him better than that. Peter admits it was a petty attempt at hurting his father, only I don't think Peter ever thought there would be a time that he cared if he had hurt his father. It just goes to show how much their relationship has changed since episode one.

Peter and Olivia trace the books he sold through Markham, who helped them track down the ZFT Manifesto in Season 1, to an artist using the books for art of questionable taste. Back at the lab, the team realizes that the mysterious Nazi is using the toxin to create Hitler's Master Race, killing people who didn't meet his blonde-hair, blue-eyed standard. They trace an ingredient found in the toxin to the Nazi's lair and the Nazi flees, but not before leaving a toxin designed to kill Walter. Peter saves Walter and they realize that the Nazi is on his way to the World Tolerance Initiative (forehead smack) to kill off those not Hitler-approved.

The team arrives and spread out to find the source the Nazi is going to use to spread the toxin. Peter finds the infected Sterno but hears someone choking and gagging. He runs to help the victim but finds the Nazi suffocating to death and looks up to see that Walter used the man's own toxin against him. Broyles is none too pleased about this but you don't mess with Walter's family legacy and expect to get off scot-free. By episode's end, Peter has returned his grandfather's books that he could find to Walter and all is forgiven. Walter shows Peter pictures of his father and the camera zooms in on the villainous Nazi from this episode standing in the background.

Now, this is where my problem with this episode lies. Are we supposed to just accept that the Nazi had been alive for this long? And with such a youthful glow? I can't help but feel this is going to come up again in future episodes but Walter has that line about some mysteries never being solved, so maybe not? Maybe sometime soon this will all make sense but it all felt a little anti-climactic in this episode. Overall, I was engrossed in this week's plot without being all that excited by it. It felt like the episode never reached high gear (they treated Peter smelling a candle and declaring it cinnamon as a scene-ending twist, for chrissake) but it also managed to successfully work Nazis into its mythology and make me hope for more. That's a (modest) win, folks.

What did you guys think? Do you think we'll get an explanation for the hundred-year-old Nazi? I sure hope so, otherwise that was a really lazy ending. Post your thoughts below.

Random Thoughts

- I would kill to see a picture of Walter in a purple suit. KILL!

- Walter's line about Peter marrying Olivia was pretty adorable. Anna Torv and Joshua Jackson have gone on record saying they don't ever want to see a Peter/Olivia (Polivia?) relationship but I don't think I'd necessarily be opposed to it. They have chemistry up the wazoo.

- Anyone else make the connection between Richard Bishop's signature being a seahorse and the fact that there's a seahorse picture before certain commercial breaks? I wonder if this is actually significant or just a cute lil' Easter Egg.

- Next week looks freaking amazing, can't wait till then.

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The team investigates a wedding where the groom and all of his blood relatives have suffocated to death. They soon realize that not only does the killer have ties to the Nazis, but he also has a connection to Walter's father.

At the end of last week's recap I said that I was worried about this episode of Fringe after having seen the preview. To use Nazis as a villain these days tends to indicate a lack of originality — they've been used for 60 years now as the boilerplate villain in a lot of popular culture. Luckily, "The Bishop Revival" was not the episode I worried it would be, though that doesn't necessarily mean it was all that great either.

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Premiered: September 09, 2008, on FOX
Rating: TV-14
User Rating: (5,447 ratings)
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Premise: A drama with sci-fi elements following the FBI probe of mysterious deaths aboard an airplane that landed at Boston's Logan Airport. But the deaths aboard Flight 627 are only the beginning of the story. Executive producers include J.J. Abrams ('Lost') and his 'Mission: Impossible III' co-screenwriters, Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman.

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