Frankenstein

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I know that many people — my ...

Question: I know that many people — my own sister included — refer to Dr. Frankenstein's monster by the name of his creator. Is this laziness on their part, or is there some basis in any of the Frankenstein movies for calling the creature "Frankenstein"? I read your column every week and know that if anybody would know, it would be you.<P>

 


Answer: Thank you, Jay, for your vote of confidence and for mentioning my bete noir (all right, one of my betes noirs — I'm easily peeved). While I'm sure that somewhere there's a movie in which some character screams, "Hey look, there's Frankenstein," as the monster comes round the corner in full flail, all the canonical movies, from the very first adaptation by the Edison company — Frankenstein (1910) — to the Universal and Hammer multifilm series, distinguish clearl  Read Full Article

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Free | Trailer Addict Posted: 10/7/2011

The trailer for Frankenstein. Dr. Henry Frankenstein (Colin Clive) wants to build a man in his own image, using the body of a dead man. He and his assistant Fritz (Dwight Frye) dig up a freshly buried coffin and steal the body. When they realize the head and the brains of the body are severely damaged, they decide to steal a brain from Dr. Frankenstein's former teacher Dr. Waldman (Edward van Sloan). When Fritz accidentally drops the glass jar with the label 'good brain' on it, on the floor, he decides to take the glass jar with the label 'bad brain'. Using some kind of mysterious ray that Dr. Frankenstein discovered, the body is brought to life during a thunderstorm, and the monster of Frankenstein (Boris Karloff) is born. Later, when Dr. Frankenstein realizes that he has created an aggressive monster, he and Fritz lock the monster up in a cell. When the monster is repeatedly bullied and provoked by Fritz, the monster eventually manages to kill him. When the monster escapes, he meets a little girl playing near the water. The monster and the girl throw flowers in the water. Enjoying the playing, the clumsy monster proceeds to pick up the girl and throw her in the water too. Later we learn that the little girl drowned in the incident, when her father carries her through the streets. The city's population propel into an uproar, demanding the death of Frankenstein's monster. The monster is driven into an old mill, after which the people of the city set the mill on fire.

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I know that many people — my ...

Question: I know that many people — my own sister included — refer to Dr. Frankenstein's monster by the name of his creator. Is this laziness on their part, or is there some basis in any of the Frankenstein movies for calling the creature "Frankenstein"? I read your column every week and know that if anybody would know, it would be you.<P>

 


Answer: Thank you, Jay, for your vote of confidence and for mentioning my bete noir (all right, one of my betes noirs — I'm easily peeved). While I'm sure that somewhere there's a movie in which some character screams, "Hey look, there's Frankenstein," as the monster comes round the corner in full flail, all the canonical movies, from the very first adaptation by the Edison company — Frankenstein (1910) — to the Universal and Hammer multifilm series, distinguish clearl read more

Has there ever been a gay ...

Question: Has there ever been a gay horror movie?Answer: Sure. Off the top of my head there's the gay-themed slasher movie Hellbent (2005) and its lesbian counterpart, Make a Wish (2003). Veteran exploitation filmmaker David DeCoteau has made a whole line of homoerotic horror pictures, including Voodoo Academy, The Brotherhood series and Wolves of Wall Street. The same-sex eroticism is toned down in the film version of Interview with the Vampire (1994), but it's still pretty clear. Lesbian-themed vampire movies are a dime a dozen, from Dracula's Daughter(1936) to Blood and Roses (1960) and read more

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Premise: Part 1 of two. Glossy, affectionate version of the Mary Shelley story told in flashback by Victor Frankenstein (Alec Newman) following his rescue from the Arctic ice by a grizzled ship captain (Donald Sutherland). Frankenstein recalls his youth and what sparked his desire to create life from death. William Hurt.

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