3 LBS Episodes

2006, TV Show

3 LBS Episode: "Of Two Minds"

Season 1, Episode 2
Episode Synopsis: A brain tumor threatens the lives of a pregnant woman and her unborn child, but she refuses to have radiation treatment out of fear it could harm the baby. Complicating matters are seizures the woman experiences. When Hanson operates to control the seizures, it results in unexpected side effects. Also, Jonathan becomes involved with an attractive attorney who represents one of his patients, a man accused of a violent crime.
Original Air Date: Nov 21, 2006
Guest Cast Ron Nakahara: Ryan Kim Erin Dilly: Kate Larson Malachi Weir: Eddie John Behlmann: James Marks Toks Olagundoye: Mary Addley Starla Benford: Ultrasound Nurse

November 21, 2006: Right or Left? Season 1, Episode 2

"Do you really want me to explain empathy?" says Seger. I have to say that, although I'm uncertain about the fate of this show, I do like the writing thus far. The exchange between Seger and Hanson is a great combination. I like Seger's eagerness and his persistent nature - wanting to open Hanson to the personal side of being a doctor and breaking away from acting like a machine 24/7. The major story this week - pregnant Kate Larson ( Erin Dilly), who has to decide between keeping her baby or removing a tumor that's slowly killing her - is hard to watch, but it's a solid story line to have while this show is still young and vulnerable. I'm interested, and there are still 45 minutes left in the episode.... "It's easy to be a saint," Hanson says to Holland when she comments that Seger does mean well. I love Stanley Tucci's veteran-doc attitude that he brings to the character - a convincing portrayal of a neurological surgeon who knows his stuff. I think he's spitting out the medical jargon with ease, but I'm not handing out an Emmy just yet. We're definitely seeing that he does have an emotional, calming side with his patients at times; I really liked his interaction with Kate when she was nervous on the operating table. Unfortunately, Seger hasn't witnessed that ability yet, so he's not as convinced as I am that Hanson cares. Mark Feuerstein is just as good, but in a different way. His sometimes-jittery disposition introduces a shy element blended in with his strong beliefs on certain patient cases. For those who didn't want any sex interfering with medical drama, you might want to look the other way. There seems to be a little teasing permeating through the clinic and Seger's the target. The energy between Rebound Guy (aka Seger) and Mary - the lawyer of a patient who is also a homicide suspect - is obvious to anyone walking by, and suddenly, we're in a steamy bed. I feel like that came out of nowhere. I know I mentioned some possibly flirting in last week's post, but the sudden flings aren't working for me here, like they do on Grey's Anatomy, which is an entirely different approach to medical drama. Kate's story is keeping me intrigued, though, especially when she has no control over her hands - zipping up her sweater, swatting at the hospital tray. When she sees another vision of herself, it's a freaky separation in the brain, but Hanson doesn't have the most reassuring answer when her husband asks if it will get better. Outside the hospital, Holland and Hanson are debating, and Seger and Mary are going at it again. I feel like I'm watching a different show than last week, but I'll keep an open mind, hoping it finds a flow of its own. Meanwhile, Kate's struggling with her brain not acting as a whole entity, and Holland suggests an experimental option - against Hanson's wishes - but she invites Seger to witness the exercise. I'm amazed by the contact lenses that divide her vision - the technical parts of this show are interesting to me, even if I'm still warming up to the characters. Hanson's not happy that Holland has confused his patient. "I would like to point out that you do not have to listen to your right brain.... Frankly, it's overrated." But I'm on Holland's side - Kate's right brain was telling her something. "I want to be a person who could never give up her child.... Maybe that's not who I am." With 10 minutes left in the episode, I was wondering if Hanson's vision of the little girl was ever going to show up, and just then, she appeared on the wall of his office. Clearly he's scared of it - or tired of it - and wants to leave immediately. And just as quickly, Mary and Seger seem to be over, once she stretches Seger's comments about her client to a level that sees no common ground between a doctor and a lawyer. Simultaneous surgeries make for a good ending to this episode. I liked the back-and-forth between the OR and Kate's reflection in the water, but when she reached in and pulled her head up, I was mildly disturbed, even though I understood its representation. But she's not paralyzed after all, and the baby is fine. Her language skills on the other hand... that saddens me. But it turns out that she is that person who could never give up her child. I think the second week has convinced me to root for this show, even though it may be among some tough competition ( House, ER). I think Stanley Tucci and Mark Feuerstein have a unique dynamic, and I'm hoping it grows on me even more as the feel of this show becomes more cohesive. show less
"Do you really want me to explain empathy?" says Seger. I have to say that, although I'm uncertain about the fate of this show, I do like the writing thus far. The exchange between Seger and Hanson is a great combination. I like Seger's eagerness and his persistent nature — wanting to open Hanson to the personal side of being a doctor and breaking away from acting like a machine 24/7. The major story this week — pregnant Kate Larson (Erin Dilly), who has to decide between keeping her baby or removing a tumor that's slowly killing her — is hard to watch, but it's a solid story line to have while this show is still young and vulnerable. I'm interested, and there are still 45 minutes left in the episode...."It's easy to be a saint," Hanson says to Holland when she comments that Seger does mean well. I love Stanley Tucci's veteran-doc attitude that he brings to the character — a convincing portrayal of a neurological surgeon who knows his stuff. I think he's spitting... read more

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Mark Feuerstein, Stanley Tucci, Erin Dilly, 3 LBS

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Premiered: November 14, 2006, on CBS
Rating: TV-PG
User Rating: (4 ratings)
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Premise: A top New York neurosurgeon and his highly skilled protégé explore the intricacies of the brain as they perform surgeries and care for the needs of their patients.

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