Pauly Shore
The Wiezel is all grown up, and he means business. After spending the last few years on an involuntary hiatus, Pauly Shore makes his return to TV with Minding the Store, premiering Sunday at 9 pm/ET on TBS. Shore's latest stab at small-screen success is a reality show about revitalizing The Comedy Store, a Sunset Strip landmark owned by his mom Mitzi, where the likes of Richard Pryor, Robin Williams, Jim Carrey and many others honed their comic chops. TVGuide.com checks in with Pauly about his family, legendary comedians, and his issues with women.

TVGuide.com: Your family's at the heart of Minding the Store. Did you set out with that intention?
Pauly Shore:
Well, The Comedy Store is my family's business, so of course, you're dealing with my family. But outside of the Store, my brother, my sister, my mom and dad are all a big part of the show, because I'm basically letting the audience in on my life now. Pauly is grown up. I'm not saying I'm grown-up grown-up, but I'm definitely not in my early twenties anymore. I'm not as into going out and getting crazy. I'm about getting a good night's sleep and being around the people I love.

TVGuide.com: You were 4 years old when your parents opened The Comedy Store in 1972. Who was the first comic you remember seeing there?
Shore:
I'd have to say it was probably Redd Foxx. He was before Pryor, so he was the first I saw who did the whole dirty thing. I don't want to say dirty, because he was so lovable, but he was very street. I loved that style. He was just being him. He wasn't raised in an upper-class environment, and he didn't mind showing that in his standup.

TVGuide.com: Who did the best set you've ever seen at The Comedy Store?
Shore:
Definitely Eddie Murphy. I remember seeing Eddie Murphy in the main room in the early '90s totally shredding it. He was just great. When he was on stage, you could see why he was a superstar.

TVGuide.com: Was it strange being around all these legendary comics?
Shore:
Sometimes. For instance, a long time ago, before The Comedy Store offices were at The Comedy Store, The Comedy Store offices were at my house. So every week, all the comedians would come over to pick up their checks. I remember Robin Williams coming over in his Mork & Mindy outfit, in the suspenders and the baggy pants, and getting in my face and saying, "Nanu, nanu." That was fun.

TVGuide.com: On a recent episode of HBO's Entourage, you were tossed out of the Playboy mansion. In Store, viewers will see you go to a therapist for sexual addiction. Is this troubled horndog the real Pauly?
Shore:
One of my biggest problems with relationships in the past has been being faithful, and I don't mind making fun of that. That's why I don't have a girlfriend now. I'd rather be honest and alone than be dishonest and in a relationship. I can't handle the guilt. So the sex thing is something I want to try to cure before I fall in love with someone and make the same mistake again.

TVGuide.com: In Store, you still seem to be pursued by beautiful women. Have you noticed any drop-off in female attention since your movie career fizzled?
Shore:
No. It's the same. Fame is a weird thing. It's like in Dazed and Confused when Matthew McConaughey says, "We keep getting older and they keep getting younger."

TVGuide.com: I believe the quote is, "We keep getting older, but they stay the same age."
Shore:
You're totally right, bro. That makes a lot more sense.

TVGuide.com: Legally speaking, it certainly does.