[Warning! This story contains spoilers from the final episode of Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life! Read at your own risk!]

When Netflix announced it was reviving the beloved WB/CW series Gilmore Girls, there were three subjects fans desperately wanted and needed the revival to address. First, there was the topic of the infamous "final four words" that fans were denied when series creator Amy Sherman-Palladino and her husband and executive producer, Daniel Palladino, left amid contract disputes following Season 6.

Second, fans wanted closure regarding the battle for Rory's (Alexis Bledel)'s heart. It sounds trivial -- and it totally is -- but friendships have been straight up ruined over the never-ending argument surrounding whether Rory belonged with first love Dean (Jared Padalecki), bad-boy-turned-author Jess (Milo Ventimiglia) or college boyfriend Logan (Matt Czuchry). And lastly, fans needed to know if Lorelai (Lauren Graham) and Luke (Scott Patterson) eventually received the happy ending they were cheated in the original series.

Well, the good news is that Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life delivered on all fronts. We learned the somewhat shocking but still somehow fitting final four words, the mystery of Rory's love life was finally (sort of) resolved, and Luke and Lorelai tied the knot during an intimate ceremony in the middle of the night with just Rory, Lane (Keiko Agena) and Michel (Yanic Truesdale) in attendance.

Why Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life is not going to be enough for fans

Lauren Graham and Scott Patterson, <em>Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life</em>Lauren Graham and Scott Patterson, Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life

Ahead of their planned wedding the next day, the two swapped vows during a fantastical sequence that saw Stars Hollow's town square transformed by a glitter gun-wielding Kirk into a fairy tale-like setting befitting of a town so whimsical and strange it could only exist in fiction. The only way the sequence, which occurred in the final minutes of the final episode, could have been improved is if Lane and Michel were swapped out for Jess and Sookie (Melissa McCarthy). Their appearance at the late night ceremony, while not wholly out of left field given that Lane worked for Luke for years and Michel -- though he'd never admit it -- is one of Lorelai's closest friends, still felt a bit like they were merely standing in for the people who should have been there but couldn't because of logistics.

Of course, just because Luke and Lorelai finally received a happy ending doesn't mean the road traveled was without hurdles. Lorelai chose not to tell Luke she continued to go to therapy even after Emily (Kelly Bishop) chose to stop, and Luke never revealed to Lorelai that he accompanied Emily to look at possible locations for a Luke's franchise, which was one of Richard's (Edward Herrmann) dying wishes. Their respective secrets, and a complicated storyline in which they explored surrogacy, eventually created a rift between the couple, and when Lorelai announced she was going to hike the Pacific Crest Trail after reading Wild, Luke incorrectly assumed her need for space meant she was leaving him.

To be honest, Lorelai going hiking -- and without cute hiking boots! -- was so out of character that it's hard to fault Luke for jumping to conclusions. It certainly didn't help that Jess agreed her actions appeared to signal a dramatic shift in their relationship, but in the end Lorelai didn't need to go hiking to find what she was looking for. She found closure regarding her father's death and a sense of peace near, what else, a diner with a view. When she returned -- and after Luke broke out into a typical Luke rant about all the reasons they shouldn't break up -- Lorelai told him she thought they should get married.

After seven seasons, marriages to other people, a surprise daughter and years of waiting and scowling, Luke and Lorelai finally got the happy ending they deserved, and it was perfect.

All four episodes of Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life are now streaming on Netflix.