We may be halfway through, but things are just getting started on Game of Thrones.

Littlefinger (Aidan Gillan) arrived at Castle Black to officially offer his help to the Starks. But before accepting, Sansa (Sophie Turner) confronted Petyr about marrying her off to a psychopath. This confrontation didn't hold a candle, though, to seeing Bran (Isaac Hempstead-Wright) come face-to-face with the Night's King and his White Walker army.

Check out all the biggest moments in "The Door" below:

Sophie Turner and Aidan Gillen, <em>Game of Thrones</em>Sophie Turner and Aidan Gillen, Game of Thrones

The Wall: After being in the Vale just last episode, Littlefinger somehow manages to make it from the Wall faster than the Sand Snakes made it onto Trystane's boat. Although he's there to offer his help, Sansa wants nothing to do with her former mentor, since he married her to Ramsay (Iwan Rheon).

"What do you think he did?" Sansa prods Littlefinger again and again until he's forced to confront the horrors he abandoned Sansa to.

This is the most Thrones has shown us of how Sansa is emotionally and psychologically coping with the abuse she endured. Unfortunately, the main point of this scene wasn't how women deal with and overcome trauma. It was about Littlefinger's Redemption Tour 2k16.

A teary-eyed Petyr displays so much emotion here it seems completely out of character. However, it appears Littlefinger is genuinely repentant, swearing he'd do anything to go back in time and keep Sansa away from Ramsay. He also drops the knowledge that Sansa's uncle, the Blackfish, has an army who's willing to help her take back Winterfell. So while Sansa and Jon go to rally the Northern houses, Brienne (Gwendoline Christie) and Pod are off to the Riverlands.

Pyke: Theon (Alfie Allen) is no longer Reek, but neither is he the man he was before. The newly-humble Greyjoy gives his full support to Yara (Gemma Whelan) during the Kingsmoot, delivering a rousing speech with a confidence we haven't seen Theon possess in years. But just as the crowd begins to turn in Yara's favor, Euron (Pilou Asbaek) shows up to emasculate Theon and spout some sexist sh-- about Yara.

The wannabe queen quickly plays the Balon card, accusing Euron of killing his brother. And in a huge deviation from the books, Euron freely admits it, even going so far as to brag about how easy it was to throw Balon off the bridge. This show of strength wins over the Ironborn and Euron is crowned King. His first decree? To murder Theon and Yara, who have fled with all their people's best ships. But real talk: What was the point of holding an election if the winner was just going to murder the loser?

North of the Wall: In a vision far more revealing than the Tower of Joy, the Three-Eyed Raven (Max von Sydow) shows Bran the birth of the White Walkers. You see, the ice zombies weren't always bad guys. They were created by the Children of the Forest long ago to protect their society from humans, who were destroying and colonizing the Children's land.

Later, Bran's ego gets the best of him and he secretly returns to Vision World without the Raven's permission. Bran then finds himself smack dab in the middle of a White Walker army and face-to-face with the Night's King himself. But this time, Bran isn't an invisible onlooker. The Night's King is able to see Bran and grabs him by the arm, thus destroying the cave's protective spell and turning Bran into a glaring GPS beacon for the White Walkers.

Before they can book it out of there, Bran plugs back into Vision World, forcing his friends to fight off the Night's King's army while he peacefully watches his ancestors at Winterfell. (So not cool, Bran.) Meera (Ellie Kendrick) does her best to kick butt and haul Bran's lifeless body around, but she needs Hodor's (Kristian Nairn) help.

Unfortunately, Hodor is cowering in a corner until Meera's cries for help penetrate into Bran's vision. Hodor's eyes then flash white and he springs into action, putting Bran in a wheelbarrow and helping get his friends away safely. Once they've made it outside, Hodor holds the door to the cave behind him to give Meera and Bran a headstart. But the White Walkers eventually make it through, killing poor Hodor.

Throughout this whole process, Bran remains in the past, where he witnesses Hodor's young mind somehow merge with Hodor's future mind, thus forcing Wylis/Hodor to experience his own death years before it actually happens. As future Hodor begins to die, Wylis collapses to the ground screaming, "Hold the door" over and over until it simply becomes "Hodor."

So not as fun as Hodor being a horse.

What did you think of the episode?