Game of Thrones is one of the most popular shows on television. Legions of fans worldwide, a dense mythology and huge ratings mean that when Thrones is on, that's all anyone is talking about — online, and off. But if the series really wants to step it up a notch, they need to show us what's going on in Grey Worm's downstairs region.

Look, we don't want to see what's left of the castrated warrior's nethers. It's not like we wake up each morning saying, "hey, the unstoppable army of the Unsullied were gelded as young men in order to keep them focused on war and I need to see their nay worms." But particularly after this past week's episode, "Stormborn," it's a vast oversight that Grey Worm's (Jacob Anderson) lack of dangly bits weren't (metaphorically) hanging out on screen.

In the episode, the long simmering romantic tension between Unsullied leader Grey Worm, and handmaiden/advisor Missandei (Nathalie Emmanuel) finally boiled over. About to head off to war, the two kissed. Missandei disrobed. She began to pull off Grey Worm's pants... And he stopped her. Grey Worm didn't want her to look at the lack of junk; but Missandei told him she needed to see him. All of him. And she did... But the audience didn't.

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There's certainly something to be said for leaving what is — or isn't — remaining in Grey Worm's Bermuda Triangle up to the viewer's imagination. To use a comic book reference, maybe it's like Marvel villain Doctor Doom's scars: he wears a metal mask to hide them, but depending on the author and artist, it's often strongly suggested he may only have the faintest of blemishes... In his mind, the mark is much worse than it is.

If you closely watch Missandei's sympathetic — but silent — reaction, you can certainly read things that way. And clearly, regardless of lack of twig/berries, he's able to please Missandei soon after that. But given other aspects of the episode, it's a cheat.

<em>Game of Thrones</em>Game of Thrones

Specifically, when you take into account what happened with Jorah Mormont (Iain Glen). The soulful warrior has been infected with Greyscale, a disease that makes you slowly turn to something akin stone. He's one day from being exiled forever, so in a last ditch effort to save him Samwell Tarly (John Bradley) uses a drastic treatment to try and cure his ailment. Peeling him like the outside of a particularly crispy spare rib, we see everything: skin; oozing pus; the ravaged, bloody tissue under Jorah's burnt ends. It's hideous, and the camera doesn't shy away. This is also one episode after we got a "hilarious" montage of Sam cleaning up bedpans full of human feces.

It's not like Thrones has shied away from presenting us with the horror of mutilation in the past (or even in the same episode). So why skip the exhibition of Grey Worm's penot?

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Maybe it comes down to the show's skittishness with displaying male bits. Ladies, it has had no problem with in the past: in early seasons, Game of Thrones helped coin the phrase "sexposition," for scenes where important bits of plot were frequently explained by unclothed women. But displays of male nudity have been few and far between. We've seen men's wangs displayed for humor, or on dead bodies; but usually not in sexual situations. Even this argument doesn't hold water, though, because as far as we know, Grey Worm's basement is missing its rec room. They can't show anything because, as far as we know... There's nothing there.

Ultimately, Thrones may never show Grey Worm's lackage, and the show will be less for it. We'll just have to hope that whenever George R.R. Martin gets around to writing this scene in his books, he spends pages upon pages, using loving detail to describe Grey Worm's mutilated crotch .

Game of Thrones airs Sundays at 9/8c on HBO.