Sgt. Trudy Platt (Amy Morton) was put through the wringer on this week's episode of Chicago P.D. Platt was targeted by a former business associate of her father's and severely assaulted, but survived. Her father, unfortunately, wasn't as lucky, and was fatally shot by the vengeful construction worker. Platt tracked the guy down right as he was about to flee the country and seemed hell-bent on killing him to avenge her father's death... until Voight (Jason Beghe) burst in and, showing uncharacteristic restraint, convinced his longtime friend to let the justice system deal with her dad's assailant.

TVGuide.com chatted with Morton to find out how the assault is going to affect Platt going forward, and what she and Mouch (Christian Stolte) are going to do now that she's struck it rich. (On a side note, the trial of Platt's father's killer might be a great launching pad for Chicago Justice. Just sayin'.)

We rarely get to see as much of Platt as we did in Wednesday's episode. What was your reaction when you heard about this storyline?
Amy Morton:
I didn't know about the storyline until I read [the script], so I was shocked. I was like, "Whoa! Wait a minute. Wait a minute. I'm in this scene too?" I was really shocked, and I was really psyched to be able to do all this stuff. I felt like I was one of the young detectives or something.[Laughs]"What do you mean? Why am I holding a gun?" And, unfortunately, I'm crawling on the ground and eating pavement. ... Because that scene probably shot about midnight or 1:00, that didn't help. It's like, oh, aches and pains that I remember well and they're worse now that I'm older. But I also had a blast doing it. It was really, really fun. ... I had a really — I don't know if good time is the word, but it really was. I had a great time doing it, because it was such a strong storyline, and it just meant a lot to me.

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How will we see this affect Platt going forward? Will we see a trial play out?
Morton: I don't know if you see the trial play out. Not that I know of, put it that way. ... I do think that, ultimately, this affects Platt's ability to be maybe a little more [empathetic]. I think she's always sort of empathetic, but sometimes it takes her a long time to get there. I think maybe this event makes that journey a little shorter for her. That journey to empathy hopefully will take a matter of seconds rather than an entire episode. And she's rich now, so who knows what that means?

That's right! We kind of forget about it amid all the other drama, but Platt learns that her father's not as poor as she thought he was, and she inherits quite a bit of money. How is that going to play out?
Morton:
I hope it plays out in really fun ways. I would love it if she went on a spending spree or something. I think it'd be hilarious.

She and Mouch can take a trip around the world.
Morton:
Yeah, exactly.

They had some really sweet moments in this episode. Do we get to see more of them going forward?
Morton:
I hope so. You usually see more of the two of us on Firethan on P.D. ... I think this event certainly makes the Mouch/Platt relationship even stronger.

There was also a great scene between Platt and Voight, a role reversal of sorts. Do you think Voight was correct that Platt wouldn't have been able to live with herself if she had killed Wade, or do you think she'll regret not taking vengeance into her own hands?
Morton:
Yeah, I started to get all Voight in that episode and Voight had to get all Platt. It was fun. My personal opinion is, he did the right thing, absolutely. I don't think that's who she is. I don't think that's something she would have easily lived with.


Do you think she would have gone through with it if Voight hadn't intervened?
Morton:
That's a really good question. I actually don't know. I've thought about it, and ... I'm hoping [she] would have stopped [herself], but I don't know.

We assume that Voight took a different tack when he was placed in a similar situation. Do you think he'll ever open up to Platt about what happened with Justin's killer?
Morton:
I would love to see that happen. I have no idea if it'll happen, I really don't. It's weird. Hopefully most of us haven't had to deal with anything quite this severe in terms of information we know about our friend. But talking about a thing makes that dynamic very different. You know what I mean? When you actually have a very difficult conversation about something with your friend, the relationship changes. So, I think it would be really interesting to see, but again, I have no idea if they're going to add that in.

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Platt seemed to soften towards Burgess (Marina Squerciati) a bit during their interaction in the hospital. Will we see their relationship change going forward?
Morton:
I think that any time that there is a softening for Burgess, it is immediately followed by a slap, unfortunately. [Laughs]And I don't see that changing. There may be more soft moments, but it just means there's more slaps behind them, you know what I'm saying? I think [Platt] just being sort of soft around Burgess all the time is not necessarily who Platt is. I think that would be out of character. Put it this way: I think she saves all intimacy for one person, and that's Mouch.

Switching gears a bit, Platt had a hand in bringing Julie Tay (Li Jun Li) on board. Will Commander Fogel (Ian Bedford) continue to target her, and what can we expect from Tay's storyline?
Morton:
There's some really interesting stuff that happens to Julie Tay that I can't tell you about! Platt, becoming a cop in the '80s, when it was a much different scene for women, understands how hard it is for women. So I think she does have a certain protective nature about how women are treated on the force. I think she's interested in helping Tay because she also sees a very, very good cop. I don't think she sticks her neck out for a cop just because she's female. She has to see something there. She has to see a good cop. And so, I think that handout is helping a sister, because it can be really rough out there.

Speaking of Platt's previous career, she revisits doing real police work in this episode, and reminds Mouch that she used to work the streets. Do you think that's something she'd be interested in going back to?
Morton:
I don't know. That's a really good question, because I think a lot of cops do miss it at times. But then again, when you interview them about "And would you like to go back on the street?" they go, "Hell no! I'm too old for that stuff. I don't want to chase anybody anymore. My body can't do that." So I think that's exactly where Platt lives. Like, yeah, she can do the job really well, but I don't know that she wants to pound the beat every day.

Chicago P.D. airs Wednesdays at 10/9c on NBC.