Left to right: Bravo president Lauren Zalaznick, vice president of programming and production Andrew Cohen, designer/<EM>Top Design</EM> judge Jonathan Adler, <EM>Elle Decor</EM> editor-in-chief/<EM>Top Design</EM> judge Margaret Russell, Bravo executive Left to right: Bravo president Lauren Zalaznick, vice president of programming and production Andrew Cohen, designer/Top Design judge Jonathan Adler, Elle Decor editor-in-chief/Top Design judge Margaret Russell, Bravo executive

The folks at Top Design (premiering Wednesday at 11 pm/ET) kicked off the start of Bravo's newest reality show with a serious challenge — redecorating the New York City subway system. To celebrate the premiere, interior design mogul and Top Design judge Jonathan Adler transformed a 42nd Street platform into a stylish living room complete with a flat screen TV and plug-ins for iPods.

"If a New York subway stop can look a whole lot better than my living room, then they must be doing something right," Bravo president Lauren Zalaznick said at the Jan. 29 event. "Or else I'm doing something really wrong with my living room."

What Project Runway and Top Chef did for fashionistas and foodies, Top Design will do for the home-obsessed. Each week contestants — competing for a $100,000 cash prize and a spread in Elle Decorturn stark white rooms into fully decorated interiors. And they have only eight hours for each challenge.

"It was a good weight-loss program for me," said Goil Amornvivat, one of the contestants. "In the time people on Project Runway did a garment, we did a whole room."

The show promises some serious talent, and, of course, the requisite reality-show drama. In fact, the level of inspiration the contestants brought to the table pleasantly surprised Adler, even if some designs were a bit off-the-wall, so to speak.

"There was some gnarly stuff," Adler said. "There was one room that sticks out in my mind that looked like the set from Mama's Family."