Sisely Treasure, The Pussycat Dolls Present: The Search for the Next Doll
Things on Pussycat Dolls Present: The Search for the Next Doll (Tuesdays at 9 on the CW) just got a whole lot quieter. Resident troublemaker and former punk-rock singer Sisely Treasure was deemed too "unique" by the judges, as they had her hang up her boa. But before her ouster, she made some waves by comparing fellow wannabe Asia to a drag queen, loudly complaining about the lack of rehearsal time, and griping about working in groups. TVGuide.com caught up with the spunky gal to get her side of the story.

TVGuide.com: I'm confused. Last week they sent Jamie home because she didn't stand out. This week you were let go because you were too unique?
Sisely Treasure:
Ditto! That's what I'm saying.

TVGuide.com: What are they looking for?
Sisely:
I have no idea. The whole time I was there it was like, "Which way do you want me to go? Point me in the direction and I swear I'll step up to the challenge. Just show me what to do and I'll do it. I promise you I can do this."

TVGuide.com: This week you were supposed to be creative and show your personality.
Sisely:
Yeah, whatever that means. [Not understanding the expectations] was hard for me. Besides that, we're getting direction from [Dolls choreographer] Mikey [Minden, as well as two other people], and then all of a sudden the judges come off the wall with some stuff that we've never heard before. It's like, "Wow, where is this going?" It really keeps you on the edge of your seat.

TVGuide.com: Was this your first time working with a big group of girls?
Sisely:
Not really. The punk band [The Holograms] that I was in before was an all-girl band. I had been with girls like this before, I had grown up dancing with girls like this. I definitely am the most tomboyish girl out of this group. It's not the girls I had a problem with. No, what is weird about this competition is that the judges are stressing, "You've got to work as a group because that's what the Dolls do," but then it is also a competition. You don't want me to stick out, but you do want me to stick out. You don't want me to be too much 'me,' but you want me to be me. And where does that all fit in with the Pussycat Dolls? I don't know. As I said on the show, "I'm not auditioning to be in the group of these girls, I am auditioning to be in the group the Pussycat Dolls." I still believe to this day that if they put me up there with the Dolls, I don't think I would stick out. But I feel like my energy might have been over-the-top or different from the girls in the competition.

TVGuide.com: You seemed very competitive. Were you surprised that the other girls weren't?
Sisely:
What's funny about that is they were. They were just hiding it. I think I was gung ho and letting everything out. I was never really concerned about what people were going to think of me as much, so I just went for it. I think the other girls may not have shown much emotion because they might have been afraid of being on TV. Being that person, eh, I don't care.

TVGuide.com: So you don't care if they made you into the "bad" guy?
Sisely:
No. The people that get it, those are the people I want to understand me. The people that don't get it, maybe I don't care about them. That's the story of my life. I like to be true to myself first because that's what matters the most.

TVGuide.com: Did any of your former punk band mates watch this?
Sisely:
I wish I knew. I think they are, but soon after the show we had a falling-out and we didn't keep in touch. It was stressful for them, with me quitting. I was replacing a singer, so when I was leaving, it was harder for them. I was having a hard time because I had just gone through nine months of being in a band with people who I got really close to, and then on a whim I did this Pussycat Dolls thing. It's unfortunate that we aren't speaking.

TVGuide.com: Aside from that, are you happy with the way things turned out?
Sisely:
Heck, yes!

TVGuide.com: This show is such a switch from punk, what were you thinking?
Sisely:
As far as what was fresh in my head, I was in a punk band for the last year, but before that I had been in an electro/pop/rock band and before that I was in a dance-pop band and before that I was dancing backup for Britney Spears, so it is not as far-fetched as it may seem. I come from a dance background originally. It was the outlet that first got me interested in music. That and my dad taking me to a David Bowie concert when I was little.

TVGuide.com: At one point you thought maybe the hair and clothes were a distraction. Was that just a lot to deal with at once?
Sisely:
It is funny because they are making a big deal of me saying that Asia looked like a drag queen and then they go ahead and make me look like a drag queen. I was not expecting Asia to make such a big deal out of that little comment. That was hilarious to me.

TVGuide.com: Did you mean it as an insult?
Sisely:
Not at all. And I didn't really get a chance to say it, but she's ferocious when she dances. In the way that a man... [Laughs] has this different intense energy than a girl does. I think it comes from her being a New York dancer. It was more like a compliment because I have friends who are drag queens and they are over-the-top and that is what you need for stage. Don't worry, I'm not backpedaling. I don't at all regret what I said. I just thought it was funny that they made it into such a big deal and that she was crying about it.

TVGuide.com: Early on, you were unhappy about the amount of rehearsal time. Was it really that bad?
Sisely:
In this [time period] that they are saying is "a week" — which, um, isn't really that long — we were getting maybe three and a half or four hours of rehearsal with the actual performance piece, with four other girls and harmonies and choreography. It is not like American Idol, where you learn one song and you practice it by yourself and you just stand there and sing it. They are really not giving us enough credit. I wish they would have shown more of the silly auditions and the thousands of girls and how it really came down to these nine people. Just as I feel the general public takes the Pussycat Dolls for granted, I think they are taking our talent for granted.

TVGuide.com: Are you planning a solo career now?
Sisely:
Most definitely. I'm working on some new stuff right now, but I just want to take it up to the next level and blow [people's] minds.

TVGuide.com: What kind of music should we expect?
Sisely:
The next thing will be really crazy underground dance. Like Peaches meets Madonna meets Gwen Stefani meets Björk. Really intense. Just watch.

TVGuide.com: And you'll get to show off your dance moves?
Sisely:
Yeah, those "girls" are getting a little old and having kids and stuff. We need someone fresh.

TVGuide.com: Are you rooting for any of the remaining contestants?  
Sisely:
Yes! I love Anastacia. I want to see her do well, but really I feel in my heart that Melissa R. might sneak up and show people what she's got.

TVGuide.com: Do you hang out with any of them now?
Sisely:
Most definitely. Me and Anastacia and Melissa S. Melissa R. is too young. She'd be going out to all of the clubs in Hollywood with us if she could.

TVGuide.com: I imagine you and Asia aren't best pals.
Sisely:
No. Never talked to her, never became friends with her. I don't mind her, but we are very different.

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