Tuesday’s devastating terrorist attacks against the United States shut down the entertainment industry, closing major Hollywood studios, canceling awards shows and shutting down both Disney theme parks. As before with tragic events that reach across the country — most notably President Kennedy's assassination in 1963 — Americans turned to live TV coverage to try to sort through the shocking news. All regular network programming was suspended throughout Tuesday and most of Wednesday. The major television networks — ABC, CBS, NBC — featured non-stop coverage of the assault and its aftermath. MTV and VH1 replaced its regular programming with reports from CBS News, and QVC halted all shopping, opting instead to post a message urging viewers to donate blood.

Behind the scenes, the networks debated whether to push back the premieres of some of their fall shows this week. (For the latest, see Entertainment News.) According to Variety, several feature films with terrorist-related plots have been pulled from the network schedules in the next couple of days. These include ABC's planned Saturday showing of The Peacemaker and Fox's Sunday night screening of Independence Day in which explosions rock both the White House and the Empire State Building.

Organizers of the second annual Latin Grammy Awards swiftly canceled Tuesday night’s planned telecast. Meanwhile, the 53rd annual Primetime Emmy Awards — scheduled to air Sunday — was postponed indefinitely.

Hollywood’s big studios — including Warner Bros., Sony and Universal — shut their doors Tuesday in reaction to the assault on New York’s World Trade Center and the Pentagon in Arlington, Va. They were expected to reopen on Wednesday.

All Major League Baseball games were cancelled both Tuesday and Wednesday. NFL spokesman Joe Browne released a statement on Tuesday saying "Regarding Sunday's games, we will make no decision today [Tuesday]. We'll gather information and speak to several parties within the next 24 to 48 hours."

In addition, the television community was mourning the loss of regular news commentator Barbara Olson and Frasier co-creator David Angell — both of whom were on board two of the hijacked flights.

Olson — an attorney who has appeared on ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox News and CNN — was on board American Airlines Flight 77 that crashed into the Pentagon. During the hijacking, she placed two phone calls from the plane to her husband, asking him, "What should I tell the pilots to do?" Angell, a writer-producer who along with partners Peter Casey and David Lee created Frasier and Wings, was aboard American Airlines Flight 11 which crashed into the north tower of the World Trade Center. His wife was a passenger as well. Angell's credits also include writing Cheers during much of the NBC comedy’s run.

"David Angell was not only our partner, but also our friend for the past 16 years," Casey and Lee said in a statement. "He was a kind and gentle man with a quiet exterior that masked one of the sharpest comedy minds ever to write for television. We join their family and other friends in mourning their passing."

Pop superstar Madonna canceled her sold-out Tuesday night concert at the Los Angeles Staples Center. "We’re in lock-down mode and on high security," Staples center operations exec Lee Zeidman told Reuters.

The Toronto International Film Festival came to a screeching halt on Tuesday as well, but activities were expected to resume Wednesday amid tighter security.

One of many somber reminders of the tragic and unprecedented turn of events that unfolded Tuesday: The street outside of NBC’s Today show’s Rockefeller Center studio — usually packed with hundreds of spectators every day — was eerily empty Wednesday morning.