TV's Blade, Batman Begins
In Part 1 of our Q&A with David S. Goyer, the producer/writer detailed the differences and similarities between Spike TV's Blade: The Series (Wednesdays at 10 pm/ET) and its big-screen begetter. Here he shares the scoop on which other Blade characters will surface on TV, status reports on The Flash, Nicolas Cage's Ghost Rider and the Batman Begins follow-up, and the sad truth about why shows such as Threshold and Invasion suffer on the tube. 

TVGuide.com: Will other characters from the Blade films appear on the series?
David S. Goyer:
Possibly. We have a flashback in which a young Whistler, who was played by Kris Kristofferson in the films, appears. We do flashbacks, so although a lot of our characters ended up dying, we have plans, if we go into a second season, to bring back two or three other characters from the films.

TVGuide.com: Which other characters might show up?
Goyer:
Dr. Karen Jenson, the hematologist from the first movie, and Hannibal King, the nightstalker (played by Ryan Reynolds) from the third film will show up again.

TVGuide.com: Will there be any more Blade features?
Goyer:
It's possible. But foremost I want to focus on the television show. New Line likes [Blade: Trinity's] Ryan and Jessica [Biel] a lot, if there is a fourth film. 

TVGuide.com: Can you see spinning off the series into films a la Star Trek?
Goyer:
At the moment, I have a five-year plan for the TV show. We have to lay that groundwork first.

TVGuide.com: You're a real go-to action-movie guy these days. What are some of the projects you're working on?
Goyer:
I'm actually trying to slow things down a little. I'm finishing up a feature I directed for Disney, The Invisible, which will be out in 2007. It's a bit different for me, being a teen melodrama, but because I'm David Goyer there's a little bit of [the] supernatural in it. The closest I can come [to describing it is as] sort of a combination of Romeo and Juliet, Ghost and The Sixth Sense. It's about a kid sort of in limbo.

TVGuide.com: Your film fans and comic fans would love to know what's happening with The Flash.
Goyer:
I just turned in the script. I'm revising it. Soon it will go into the studio proper.

TVGuide.com: How about the Batman Begins sequel?
Goyer:
[That] is in the works as well. [Director] Chris Nolan is editing The Prestige right now, and as soon as that is finished, we're all talking about that going into much higher gear.

TVGuide.com: Is the cast returning?
Goyer:
I believe that's the intent.

TVGuide.com: And are you still doing a remake of the fondly remembered Soylent Green?
Goyer:
We're slowly moving on that. I've got a movie, Jumper, with [director] Doug Liman (Mr. and Mrs. Smith, the Bourne Identity films) based on a Steve Gould novel, and I've also written Ghost Rider, which is for the first quarter of 2007. It's an adaptation of a Marvel Comic with Nic Cage.

TVGuide.com: Do you think this is a good era for science fiction and superheroes? At least in feature films?
Goyer:
These genres are cyclical. If you look back at the Cold War period, when people were afraid of nuclear war and there was a "Red Scare," science-fiction movies were very popular. They tend to function on an allegorical level. Now there's fear of terrorism and things like that. People find it easier to stomach stories like this rather than face up to what's going on. Historically when there's global anxiety, fantasy and sci-fi and horror do well, more so than when times are better.

TVGuide.com: Why is it so hard to have successful TV sci-fi and/or fantasy series?
Goyer:
The primary reason is budgetary. If you look at movies, perhaps 90 percent of the 30 top movies are fantasy/science fiction. There is Battlestar Galactica on the Sci Fi Channel, though not on a network. [This past season] there was Invasion, Threshold and Surface, but none of them really found an audience. Maybe [such shows will] eventually.

TVGuide.com: But isn't ABC's Lost science fiction?
Goyer:
They don't like to call Lost science fiction, but it is. The X-Files was the last science-fiction hit, and for the last decade they've been looking for the next X-Files. But I'm excited about Blade, and my object with Blade is to deliver a show that will satisfy the Spike audience as well as a broader audience. I think it will be more sophisticated than people expect it to be.