Today's News: Our Take


Entertainment Newsmags Show Respect


In any other week, Yasmine Bleeth's recent arrest on alleged drug charges would command big headlines on the syndicated entertainment shows Access Hollywood, Entertainment Tonight and Extra. But in the wake of last Tuesday's horrific terrorist attacks, such celebrity scandals are being tossed aside like yesterday's news.

"We're not touching Yasmine Bleeth," Access Hollywood executive producer Rob Silverstein insists to TV Guide Online. "It's not something we're interested in. If none of this ever happened, of course, that's something we would cover. But we don't think stories like that are appropriate at this time."

While Access, ET and Extra have been pre-empted by news coverage in much of the country since Tuesday, most affiliates were expected to return to normal programming this week. And in addition to the Bleeth blackout, Silverstein says viewers tuning in can expect a kinder, gentler Access read more

Question: Please help me. Did ...

Question: Please help me. Did I miss something or did they not resolve what happened to the new girl that was shot in the first episode of CSI? I thought maybe here in Australia they mucked up and missed an episode. Please help me, as there is no one as brilliant as you to ask here at home (we have a crap TV mag). Thank you in advance! — Michelle T, Hastings, Victoria

Televisionary: Ah, Michelle. You pushed all the right buttons — buttering me up on both the personal and professional fronts and, as a bonus, writing from the other side of the planet when you know I take childish glee in reaching readers in faraway lands. Nevertheless, I shall tell you only that the shooting of Holly Gribbs (Chandra West) is dealt with and given closure in a future episode of the hit drama.

I mean, for crying out loud, it's the least they could do for a woman they treated the worst of any main character in any pilot I've ever seen read more

Question: Could you find the ...

Question: Could you find the name of the pop string group that plays for the Raymond Weil parsifal commercial? I saw it on USA today and would like to pass their name on to my string students. Thanks.

Televisionary: That's the UK's pop-classical girl group Bond, who are linked to the watchmaker under a marketing alliance reported to be in the range of $7 million. The song is called "Victory" and it's from the band's album Born.

Often called the Spice Girls of classical music because the band consists of four attractive women wearing stylish, figure-revealing clothes, Bond actually dabbles in all sorts of audio flavors, including house, dance and salsa. The band consists of Aussies Haylie Ecker (violin) and Tania Davis (viola) and Brits Eos Chater (violin) and Gay-Yee Westerhoff (cello), all of whom have their fingers insured for a reported $1 million each. It's also worth noting that in contrast to the typical, manufacture read more

The Story Behind the Emmy Delay


The decision to delay the 53rd annual Primetime Emmy Awards for three weeks — from Sept. 16 to Oct. 7 — marks a first in Emmy history: Never before has a news event delayed TV's biggest night. But clearly, never before has there been a news event quite like last Tuesday's deadly terrorist attacks in New York and Washington D.C.

"In the past, TV academy leaders always decided, in the great Hollywood tradition, to go on with the show no matter what happened — even in 1980 when no stars showed up because of an actors' strike," notes award show expert Tom O'Neil, author of The Emmys and host of showbiz-awards website GoldDerby.com. "But this year Emmy leaders were afraid that it might look heartless of Hollywood to carry on with a posh party for itself and bestow gold trophies for best comedy actor and actress at a time of national mourning."

There was n read more

Question: About 10 years ago, ...

Question: About 10 years ago, there was a show on MTV called Dead at 21. Can you enlighten me to the plot of the story and what each main character's stake was in the grander scheme?

Televisionary: No problem, except for the part about the "grander scheme," since I can't necessarily bless any scheme in the show with that description.

Nevertheless, in the show, which ran for 13 episodes beginning in 1994, notably bright 20-year-old Ed Bellamy (Jack Noseworthy) discovered the disturbing reason for his intelligence and the wacky dreams he'd been having: government tomfoolery. It seems that those meddling feds — in a bid to increase child intelligence — put chips in the heads of Ed and his fellow guinea pigs shortly after they were born. Of course, like so many shady government experiments, this one was a dud and all "neurocybernauts" (couldn't they settle on one cool prefix?) died when they reached the legal drinking age due to complica read more

TV Nets Scour Content


As television networks scramble to remove any inappropriate programming content related to Tuesday's deadly terrorist attacks, HBO is admitting that it dropped the ball when it came to Sunday night's broadcast of the 1994 action flick Drop Zone. The film stars Wesley Snipes as a U.S. Marshall thwarting a international drug plot. One scene features a brutal hijacking of a commercial airliner.

"This one obviously was missed," an HBO rep sighs to TV Guide Online. "We have pulled 11 movies so far from HBO and Cinemax channels. We apologize that we overlooked this one. The people in scheduling are in the process of still pulling other programs from the schedule for the upcoming weeks. I guess there are so many to go through and screen."

Last week, HBO made the decision to yank print and on-air promotions for its World War II epic Band of Brothers. However, the 10-part Sunday series h read more

Question: Can you tell me who ...

Question: Can you tell me who played Hunter in the old TV series by that name? Thank you. — AJ

Televisionary: That was ex-All-Pro defensive end Fred Dryer, who spent three years with the New York Giants and 10 with the L.A. Rams before grabbing a very big gun and hitting the streets as tough-guy detective Rick Hunter on the NBC series. From the TV house of Stephen J. Cannell (The A-Team, The Rockford Files, 21 Jump Street, Wiseguy), the show ran from September 1984 to August 1991 and initially focused on Hunter, a tough, take-no-prisoners, obey-no-superiors kind o read more

The Story Behind the Emmy Delay


The decision to delay the 53rd annual Primetime Emmy Awards for three weeks — from Sept. 16 to Oct. 7 — marks a first in Emmy history: Never before has a news event delayed TV's biggest night. But clearly, never before has there been a news event quite like last Tuesday's deadly terrorist attacks in New York and Washington D.C.

"In the past, TV academy leaders always decided, in the great Hollywood tradition, to go on with the show no matter what happened — even in 1980 when no stars showed up because of an actors' strike," notes award show expert Tom O'Neil, author of The Emmys and host of showbiz-awards website GoldDerby.com. "But this year Emmy leaders were afraid that it might look heartless of Hollywood to carry on with a posh party for itself and bestow gold trophies for best comedy actor and actress at a time of national mourning."

There was n read more

TV News Coverage Makes the Grade


As expected, Americans were fixated on their television sets Tuesday night as some 60 million people tuned into the major networks for news coverage surrounding the devastating terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, D.C. Viewing levels peaked between 8:30 and 9 pm when President Bush addressed the nation. Of course, that 60 million figure doesn't include the millions glued to cable channels such as CNN, MSNBC and Fox News. (Reportedly, 75 percent of all TV viewers were watching one of the broadcast or cable nets — a number that some have called extraordinary.)

On a whole, critics have given high marks to the wall-to-wall coverage. "Mistakes have been few and swiftly corrected under the most trying of circumstances," enthused Ed Martin of the industry newsletter The Myers Report. "Every anchor person and every reporter on every network is to be commended." USA Today columnist Peter Johnson, meanwhile, applauded the TV news in read more

Entertainment World Halts to Mourn


Tuesday’s devastating terrorist attacks against the United States shut down the entertainment industry, closing major Hollywood studios, canceling awards shows and shutting down both Disney theme parks. As before with tragic events that reach across the country — most notably President Kennedy's assassination in 1963 — Americans turned to live TV coverage to try to sort through the shocking news. All regular network programming was suspended throughout Tuesday and most of Wednesday. The major television networks — ABC, CBS, NBC — featured non-stop coverage of the assault and its aftermath. MTV and VH1 replaced its regular programming with reports from CBS News, and QVC halted all shopping, opting instead to post a message urging viewers to donate blood.

Behind the scenes, the networks debated whether to push back the premieres of some of their fall shows this week. (For the latest, see Entertainment News.) read more

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