Variety Girl

  • 1947
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Musical

This musical extravaganza features just about everyone under contract to Paramount in 1947 (except Betty Hutton, who was pregnant at the time, and Eddie Bracken). Made in cooperation with the Variety Club charity organization, it's the thin tale of two young Hollywood hopefuls who come to Paramount and meet the studio's entire work force. Variety Club protege...read more

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This musical extravaganza features just about everyone under contract to Paramount in 1947 (except Betty Hutton, who was pregnant at the time, and Eddie Bracken). Made in cooperation with the Variety Club charity organization, it's the thin tale of two young Hollywood hopefuls who come to

Paramount and meet the studio's entire work force. Variety Club protege Catherine Brown (Mary Hatcher) arrives in Hollywood to try her luck as an actress and meets starlet Amber La Vonne (Olga San Juan). The girls go to Paramount's Melrose Avenue lot and run into all the studio's stars, with a

minor complication occurring when Amber is mistaken for the auditioning "Variety Girl." Eventually, Catherine convinces everyone that she's the real ingenue, and there's a huge show benefitting the Variety Clubs at the conclusion of the picture. The film moves along so briskly and with such good

humor under George Marshall's capable direction that one can overlook the shortcomings of the story. Dorothy Lamour and Alan Ladd, Bob Hope and Bing Crosby, Pearl Bailey, Spike Jones, the Original Dixieland Jazz Band, and a quartet made up of William Holden, Ray Milland, Cass Daley, and Joan

Caulfield are among those performing the tunes, although many other stars are on-screen for the briefest of cameos. Several famous directors also appear as themselves. Frank Loesser wrote many of the songs for the film, which include "Tallahassee" (sung by Dorothy Lamour as a stewardess and Alan

Ladd as the pilot on an airliner), "He Can Waltz," "The French," "Your Heart Calling Mine," "Impossible Things," "I Want My Money Back," "I Must Have Been Madly in Love." Johnny Burke and Jimmy Van Heusen wrote the duet "Harmony" for Hope and Crosby, who did a very funny golf sequence. Pearl

Bailey sang "Tired" (Allan Roberts, Doris Fisher), and Edward Plumb's "Romeow and Julicat" was seen as part of a George Pal "Puppetoon" sequence. "Mildred's Boogie" was written by Mildred and James Mulcay, while Jelly Roll Morton's "Tiger Rag" was performed by the Original Dixieland Jazz Band.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: This musical extravaganza features just about everyone under contract to Paramount in 1947 (except Betty Hutton, who was pregnant at the time, and Eddie Bracken). Made in cooperation with the Variety Club charity organization, it's the thin tale of two you… (more)

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