Vanity Fair

  • 1932
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Drama

For reasons that have never been fully explained, MGM lent one of its stars to a small independent company to make this modern-dress version of Thackeray's well-known drama. The original story caused a great brouhaha in England because it raked the doyennes of London's society over the coals but Loy, no matter how good she was, couldn't personally save...read more

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For reasons that have never been fully explained, MGM lent one of its stars to a small independent company to make this modern-dress version of Thackeray's well-known drama. The original story caused a great brouhaha in England because it raked the doyennes of London's society over the

coals but Loy, no matter how good she was, couldn't personally save this movie, which was ill-conceived from the start, almost as though someone decided to take a classic like A TALE OF TWO CITIES and cast Sylvester Stallone in the role of the two men, then place it in Cleveland and Cincinnati.

Loy plays the role of the nimble woman who uses her wiles and native wit and tramples her way through several hearts until she winds up in a marriage that she thinks will be the answer to all of her cunning prayers. It isn't, of course, and she receives her comeuppance in the conclusion. Loy, born

Myrna Williams in Montana, was only 27 at this time and already appearing in her 58th film! The direction for this was slack, the dialog trite, and the cinematography ordinary although none of the actors can be faulted. Note veteran comedian Billy Bevan, an Australian who appeared in many Mack

Sennett shorts, in a dramatic role. Odd that such a misfire could come from the typewriter of the usually excellent F. Hugh Herbert, who began writing in 1927 for the screen and would later be responsible for the scripts for SITTING PRETTY, SCUDDA HOO, SCUDDA HAY, KISS AND TELL, and THE MOON IS

BLUE, among many others. Director Franklin, brother of Sidney Franklin, never quite caught the nuances of the story and was a poor choice for the task. It was remade three years later with Miriam Hopkins as BECKY SHARP in a color production. The first attempt at this story was a 1923 silent. None

of the three did justice to it.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: For reasons that have never been fully explained, MGM lent one of its stars to a small independent company to make this modern-dress version of Thackeray's well-known drama. The original story caused a great brouhaha in England because it raked the doyenne… (more)

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