Tomorrow Is Forever

  • 1946
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Drama, War

Tired variation on an old theme produced under David Lewis' International Pictures banner. There's not much to recommend here other than the debut of 6-year-old Wood and a host of superior costumes from Jean Louis. It starts around the time of WW I as Colbert and Welles are wed. The call to arms comes, and Welles goes to do battle with the forces of the...read more

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Tired variation on an old theme produced under David Lewis' International Pictures banner. There's not much to recommend here other than the debut of 6-year-old Wood and a host of superior costumes from Jean Louis. It starts around the time of WW I as Colbert and Welles are wed. The call

to arms comes, and Welles goes to do battle with the forces of the Kaiser. He is scarred horribly, becomes lame, and chooses to be reported as dead rather than face his wife and new son as a crippled, ugly man. Settling in Austria, Welles takes on a new identity and Colbert, thinking herself a

widow, marries Brent and lives happily, bearing another child, Wood, and enjoying her second chance at joy. Brent runs a plant that manufactures chemicals and as plot contrivance would have it, he hires Welles to come to the U.S. from Austria. Despite his long beard, his limp, and an attempt to

disguise himself, it isn't many moments before Colbert realizes who he is. She is having her woes with son Long who wants nothing more than to join the Air Corps and fly off to fight the new version of the Germans. With Welles aware that Colbert knows who he is and his feelings toward the son he

never knew, there is every opportunity for emotional highlights in the film, but they are missed, and the movie becomes a series of climaxes without enough motivation. The film is slow-moving and yawnable, though some restraint is shown by Welles. Director Pichel moved the actors around as though

they'd all just awakened from a nap. He also used his own voice as that of the commentator. A fine cast is wasted in a trifling story.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Tired variation on an old theme produced under David Lewis' International Pictures banner. There's not much to recommend here other than the debut of 6-year-old Wood and a host of superior costumes from Jean Louis. It starts around the time of WW I as Colb… (more)

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