There's Always Tomorrow

  • 1956
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Drama

Another of director Sirk's melodramatic, bitter attacks on the values of American middle-class life in the 1950s, this one stars MacMurray as a middle-aged milquetoast who lives in a claustrophobic home with his token wife, Bennett, and their three self-absorbed children. At the toy company where he works, he okays production of a robot, Rex, which walks...read more

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Another of director Sirk's melodramatic, bitter attacks on the values of American middle-class life in the 1950s, this one stars MacMurray as a middle-aged milquetoast who lives in a claustrophobic home with his token wife, Bennett, and their three self-absorbed children. At the toy

company where he works, he okays production of a robot, Rex, which walks and talks. Its line, "Push me and steer me wherever you can," clearly summarizes MacMurray's life. He finds new hope when he is reunited with an old flame, Stanwyck. Although their reunion begins innocently enough,

MacMurray's teenage son, Reynolds, is determined to catch his father in an embarrassing circumstance. Reynolds (like the character he played in Sirk's previous film, ALL THAT HEAVEN ALLOWS) is a brat who refuses to allow his father a life other than that of provider. MacMurray entertains thoughts

of running off with Stanwyck, but she decides that MacMurray should stay with his family. MacMurray is "pushed and steered" back into his home, depressed because he cannot go back to the days of his youth and fearful of a tomorrow that holds no hope. It should come as no surprise that a film with

an outlook this bleak should draw less than enthusiastic reviews, especially during the supposedly idyllic 1950s. In fact, Sirk's view was even darker than what appeared on the screen. The ending he filmed has MacMurray's robot marching across a table top--making a final connection between his

character and Rex. The original scenario had Rex reaching the edge of the desk and toppling to the ground. After crashing to the floor, the robot would struggle through a few final kicks before the end credits rolled. Sirk told his biographer, Michael Stern (Douglas Sirk): "In tragedy the life

always ends. By being dead, the hero is at the same time rescued from life's troubles. In melodrama, he lives on--in an unhappy happy end." This was filmed previously under the same title in 1934.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Another of director Sirk's melodramatic, bitter attacks on the values of American middle-class life in the 1950s, this one stars MacMurray as a middle-aged milquetoast who lives in a claustrophobic home with his token wife, Bennett, and their three self-ab… (more)

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