The True And The False

  • 1955
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Drama

Swedish actress Hasso took on producing chores as well for this film, which combines two short stories by Balzac and de Maupassant with less than successful results. The stories are connected by an unneeded bridge: Hasso reading short stories on the night before she is to wed Langford. First is Balzac's tale "La Grande Breteche." A couple lives in an abandoned...read more

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Swedish actress Hasso took on producing chores as well for this film, which combines two short stories by Balzac and de Maupassant with less than successful results. The stories are connected by an unneeded bridge: Hasso reading short stories on the night before she is to wed Langford.

First is Balzac's tale "La Grande Breteche." A couple lives in an abandoned French castle. Hasso, the wife, takes a lover. One night when she is with this man, her husband (Langford again) comes home. The lover hides in a closet and the suspicious Langford has his hideaway bricked up, thus sealing

the lover to certain death. Next is de Maupassant's "The Old Maid," which concerns a young girl who loves a soldier. He feels nothing for her, though, as he only wants a bride with money. Later the girl is horribly frostbitten and permanently disfigured as a result. When her father passes away,

leaving her all his money, the girl looks up the soldier, who now claims he loves her. She only gives him the money and goes to live in seclusion. The two stories are told in a confusing flashback-within-a-flashback style that takes a while to be understood. Once that is cleared up, the direction

still ranks as fairly poor, never really focusing on connecting themes. The cast goes through the motions but without much success. The photography by Ingmar Bergman's photographer Nykvist is only average. (In English.)

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Swedish actress Hasso took on producing chores as well for this film, which combines two short stories by Balzac and de Maupassant with less than successful results. The stories are connected by an unneeded bridge: Hasso reading short stories on the night… (more)

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