The Sweetest Thing

A derivative and thoroughly predictable romantic gross-out comedy distinguished — if that's the word — by the fact that it's written from the woman's point of view. Not that its female-centric (though not exactly feminist) point of view makes it any less obnoxious. In fact, the film is so thoroughly rank — imagine a female version of TOMCATS...read more

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Reviewed by Steve Simels
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A derivative and thoroughly predictable romantic gross-out comedy distinguished — if that's the word — by the fact that it's written from the woman's point of view. Not that its female-centric (though not exactly feminist) point of view makes it any less obnoxious. In fact, the film is so thoroughly rank — imagine a female version of TOMCATS — that first-time screenwriter Nancy Pimental, the potty-mouthed co-host of TV's Win Ben Stein's Money, should have her mouth washed out with soap. The plot is mega-slight, even by the standards of such things. San Francisco yuppie roommates Courtney Rockliffe (Christina Applegate), Jane Brown (Selma Blair) and Christina Walters (Cameron Diaz, who looks smashing in her off-the-shoulder blouse) are first glimpsed hanging out at some hellish dance club. Enter out-of-towner Peter Donahue (Thomas Jane); Christina's first impulse is to blow him off cruelly, but — to her own great surprise — she actually cottons to the guy. The hungover next day, Courtney convinces Christina to track Peter down, and off they go on a road-trip to his brother's wedding — or so they think. The audience, of course, knows all is not what it seems, matrimony-wise. Along the way, there's time for insipid comic sequences involving maggoty food, a men's-room glory hole, a clueless dress shop owner (Georgia Engel, who played Ted Baxter's wife on The Mary Tyler Moore Show), and the inevitable cameo by Parker Posey. With the exception of Jane's sensitive real estate broker, there isn't a character, major or minor, who isn't some kind of offensive stereotype. Every woman is either a bitch or an idiot; every gay guy is a screaming queen; all single straight guys are self-absorbed louts; and anybody who doesn't have the brains to live in a major urban area is either a bigot or a hopeless bourgeois boob. There isn't a plot twist or a gag you can't anticipate — if you don't see the big getting-locked-in-the-bathroom-at-the-wedding sequence coming down Broadway, you've probably never seen a movie before. It's hard to overstate just how awful this movie is, despite the efforts of the appealing cast.

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  • Released: 2002
  • Rating: R
  • Review: A derivative and thoroughly predictable romantic gross-out comedy distinguished — if that's the word — by the fact that it's written from the woman's point of view. Not that its female-centric (though not exactly feminist) point of view makes it… (more)

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