The Strange One

  • 1957
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Drama

Based on a play that ran briefly in New York's Lyceum Theatre in the mid-1950s, this film was not a hit in its stage incarnation on Broadway, nor did it do much on the screen. Gazzara and many of the others were reprising their roles under the guidance of the same man who directed the stage version, Jack Garfein. In a southern military school, Gazzara is...read more

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Based on a play that ran briefly in New York's Lyceum Theatre in the mid-1950s, this film was not a hit in its stage incarnation on Broadway, nor did it do much on the screen. Gazzara and many of the others were reprising their roles under the guidance of the same man who directed the

stage version, Jack Garfein. In a southern military school, Gazzara is the student leader who wields power over the younger students. He's abetted by Hingle and Olson, who take equal delight in causing pain to the frightened lowerclassmen, epitomized by Storch, a young man who is homosexual. Gates

is one of the "adults" at the school (though many of the younger players seem too old for their roles) and knows how bad the situation is. He would like to get rid of Gazzara and Gazzara knows it, so he tries to discredit Gates every chance he can. Gazzara is the ultimate wise guy. He's mean,

arrogant, angry, and has the run of the school until some of the younger students finally revolt (led by Peppard, in his motion picture debut). Wilson is the only female in the cast, in a role that did not exist in the novel or the play. She is a woman of loose morals, and her part doesn't much

matter in the proceedings, but her voice does relieve the sound of all those baritones. Richards did some homosexual scenes which wound up on the cutting room floor; the strict censorship of the Motion Picture Production Code at that time specifically stated that there could be no sexual

perversion nor any inference of it on the screen. Garfein, who was married to sexpot Carroll Baker, made his directorial debut in films with this and did well, although the subject matter and the general darkness of the mood worked against its becoming a financial success. New Yorker Richman, a

graduate pharmacist who gave up pills and potions for acting, was appearing in his second film after FRIENDLY PERSUASION. He later changed his name to Peter Mark Richman. Willingham's novel was also filmed with a female lead as SORORITY GIRL, 1957.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Based on a play that ran briefly in New York's Lyceum Theatre in the mid-1950s, this film was not a hit in its stage incarnation on Broadway, nor did it do much on the screen. Gazzara and many of the others were reprising their roles under the guidance of… (more)

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