The Strange Love Of Molly Louvain

  • 1932
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Drama

The strange thing about the love of the title lady is that it should be pluralized; she gets around a bit. Dvorak is a hotel clerk who meets and melts for ne'er-do-well playboy Dilloway, who dallies with her only long enough to impregnate her and then leaves town. Dissolve to her liaison with the ill-fated Fenton, a salesman who has admired her for some...read more

Where to Watch

Available to Stream

  • Watch on
Rating:

The strange thing about the love of the title lady is that it should be pluralized; she gets around a bit. Dvorak is a hotel clerk who meets and melts for ne'er-do-well playboy Dilloway, who dallies with her only long enough to impregnate her and then leaves town. Dissolve to her liaison

with the ill-fated Fenton, a salesman who has admired her for some time. He is really a crook but he is willing to take her complete with infant daughter as a package. She and Cromwell, the bellboy who has adored her since her hotel days, are in a stolen car with Fenton when he is stopped by a

cop, whom he kills. Dvorak and her youthful swain, fearing charges of complicity, hide out in a rooming house also occupied by wisecracking newspaperman Tracy (in a familiar role, one he played many times). Unrecognizably blonde now, bleached brunette Dvorak finds herself getting romantically

involved with the roving reporter, to the discomfiture of Cromwell. Tracy, hot for a scoop, is pursuing the runaway pair, unaware that they are right under his nose. The scheming scribbler hatches a plot: he has a friendly radio newsman broadcast that Dvorak's child is ill in order to bait her

into the open. He is present, and appropriately surprised, when the lost lady ambles into a police station to give herself up. Realizing that he loves her, Tracy promises to help see her through her legal ordeal. Some good dialog, but with uneven cutting, perhaps due to censorship. This is not

regarded as one of prolific director Curtiz's better efforts. Dvorak handled the comedic sequences well but didn't quite come off as a tragic, circumstance-tossed heroine; she was fresh from MGM's chorus line, with only Howard Hughes' SKY DEVILS to her credit at this point.

Cast & Details See all »

  • Rating: NR
  • Review: The strange thing about the love of the title lady is that it should be pluralized; she gets around a bit. Dvorak is a hotel clerk who meets and melts for ne'er-do-well playboy Dilloway, who dallies with her only long enough to impregnate her and then leav… (more)

Show More »