The Prophecy 2

  • 1998
  • Movie
  • R
  • Horror

A typically off-the-wall performance by Christopher Walken is the only virtue of THE PROPHECY II, a dull and cheap-looking direct-to-video sequel to the 1995 cult film about a group of warring angels who come to Earth to raise hell. While driving to work, LA nurse Valerie Rosales (Jennifer Beals) accidentally hits a homeless man named Danyael (Russell Wong)...read more

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A typically off-the-wall performance by Christopher Walken is the only virtue of THE PROPHECY II, a dull and cheap-looking direct-to-video sequel to the 1995 cult film about a group of warring angels who come to Earth to raise hell.

While driving to work, LA nurse Valerie Rosales (Jennifer Beals) accidentally hits a homeless man named Danyael (Russell Wong) and takes him to the hospital. When he recovers, he goes home with Valerie, where they make love. The next day, Valerie learns she's pregnant. Meanwhile, the archangel

Gabriel (Christopher Walken) arrives in LA and goes to Valerie's house to kill her, but Danyael rescues her and they take refuge in a church. He tells her that he is an angel, revealing his wings to prove it, and explains that Gabriel is leading an army of evil angels that are trying to destroy

mankind because he's jealous of God's affection for humans. He also says that she has been chosen to carry a half human-half angel baby which will unite the angels and end their war.

Danyael takes Valerie to the remnants of Eden, which is inside a burned-out industrial park and seeks the help of Michael (Eric Roberts) the leader of the good angels, but when Gabriel arrives, Michael lets him inside. During a fight with Gabriel, Danyael is killed, but when Gabriel catches

Valerie on the top of a high beam, the voice of God tells her to jump, and she leaps into the air, taking Gabriel with her. Gabriel is impaled on a spike and Valerie is unharmed. She tells Michael that she's keeping the baby, even though she's aware that the angels will probably come and take it

away someday. Five years later, Valerie kisses her son Danyael Jr. (Michael Raimi) goodbye and puts him on a school bus. As it drives away, Gabriel, who's now a homeless drunk, sits on the streetcorner and watches the bus go by.

THE PROPHECY was far from classic, but at least its premise was offbeat and somewhat original, offering an intriguing mixture of Old Testament mysticism and contemporary horror, as well as Christopher Walken's amusing turn as a tongue-in-cheek maniac. Unfortunately, the sequel recycles the same

elements in a thoroughly unimaginative way and jumps from scene to scene with little attempt to present a coherent or interesting story. The whole movie has the look of a low-budget music video, with a plethora of tilted angles, blue smoke, flash-cuts, and slo-mo explosions, and the special

effects are pretty shoddy (Danyael's wings are shown only in shadow; there are visible outlines on matte shots; and Gabriel's arrival on Earth from Hell is via a highly unconvincing earthquake in a parking lot, replete with phony looking cracked asphalt and orange lighting). With the rest of the

cast behaving as if they're actually making a serious film, Walken's bemused performance is the only reason it's at all watchable, as he seems to be acting in his own private comedy, making snide wisecracks about the idiocy of the situations and the characters like some kind of supernatural Greek

chorus. Walken has defended his appearances in bad movies by stating that he likes to work and takes whatever he's offered, but it's a sad sight to see him wasting his prodigious talent on junk like this. (Graphic violence, profanity, nudity, sexual situations.)

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  • Released: 1998
  • Rating: R
  • Review: A typically off-the-wall performance by Christopher Walken is the only virtue of THE PROPHECY II, a dull and cheap-looking direct-to-video sequel to the 1995 cult film about a group of warring angels who come to Earth to raise hell. While driving to work,… (more)

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