The Price Of Milk

From its quilted opening credits, which literally unfold across the screen, to its fairy-tale ending, this is easily one of the oddest romantic comedies since MY NEW GUN. It's also one of the most visually inventive, and if its charms very nearly defy description, it's nonetheless irresistible. Lucinda (Danielle Cormack) and Rob (Xena's Karl Urban) are living...read more

Where to Watch

Available to Stream

  • Watch on
Reviewed by Ken Fox
Rating:

From its quilted opening credits, which literally unfold across the screen, to its fairy-tale ending, this is easily one of the oddest romantic comedies since MY NEW GUN. It's also one of the most visually inventive, and if its charms very nearly defy description, it's nonetheless irresistible. Lucinda (Danielle Cormack) and Rob (Xena's Karl Urban) are living happily ever after in unwedded bliss on a picturesque dairy farm, surrounded by 117 cows and Nigel, an agoraphobic dog who lives like a turtle beneath a cardboard box. All's well until Rob proposes marriage, with a smile and an offhand "Whaddaya reckon?" Lucinda accepts, but then goes into pre-matrimonial panic. While fretting over whether the spark has now deserted their relationship, she accidentally mows down a stranger wrapped from head to toe in woolens; the stranger gets up, offers a strange warning ("Keep warm!") and disappears into the woods. That night, Lucinda and Rob's beloved quilt vanishes from their sleeping bodies, snatched by the members of a local Maori golf team on behalf of their aged Auntie (Rangi Motu). Lucinda tracks down the quilt, but Auntie insists on a trade; on an impulse, Lucinda trades away Rob's beloved cows, retrieving her quilt but putting her fiance's love to the ultimate test. Things only get weirder once Rob realizes what Lucinda's done, but just when this bit of romantic whimsy stops making sense, along comes an image so breathtaking you won't much care about the logic behind it: Lucinda, dressed in a ruby red sari, wrapping a hillside in a ribbon of cloth, for example, or a lake full of baby shoes. The symphonic score, a sampler of Russian heavy-hitters (Anatol Liadov, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, Sergei Rachmaninov), flows through this lush, colorful film like warm butterscotch.

Cast & Details See all »

  • Released: 2000
  • Rating: PG-13
  • Review: From its quilted opening credits, which literally unfold across the screen, to its fairy-tale ending, this is easily one of the oddest romantic comedies since MY NEW GUN. It's also one of the most visually inventive, and if its charms very nearly defy desc… (more)

Show More »