The Owl And The Pussycat

  • 1970
  • Movie
  • R
  • Comedy

For her first non-singing role, Streisand chose this bawdy adaptation of Manhoff's hit 1964 play, which starred Alan Alda and Diana Sands. The female lead, written to be played a black woman, was altered to fit Streisand's ethnicity, but many of the play's jokes remain intact. Former choreographer Ross was directing his second film (his first was the unfortunate...read more

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For her first non-singing role, Streisand chose this bawdy adaptation of Manhoff's hit 1964 play, which starred Alan Alda and Diana Sands. The female lead, written to be played a black woman, was altered to fit Streisand's ethnicity, but many of the play's jokes remain intact. Former

choreographer Ross was directing his second film (his first was the unfortunate remake of GOODBYE, MR. CHIPS) and did well handling the two volatile stars. Segal, a writer who works in a bookstore, suspects that neighbor Streisand is a prostitute and tells his landlord, Sandulescu, who responds by

evicting Streisand. When she learns the reason for her ouster, Streisand shows up at Segal's apartment late one night and moves in with him, shrieking all the while that he is a gay fink. Segal is thunderstruck and allows her to stay. (Well, of course, he does. If he didn't there wouldn't be a

story.) Streisand develops a case of hiccups, and Segal, in an attempt to cure her, dons a skeleton suit. Her response is to scream so loudly that the neighbors complain and Segal is evicted. With no place to stay, the two descend on the apartment of Klein, who is there with his girl friend, Lang

(porn star Marilyn Chambers, appearing here under a pseudonym). When Segal and Streisand begin battling, Klein and Lang leave the apartment. The argument continues until Streisand turns on her "charm" and beds Segal. However, the next day, they are at each other's throats once more. She takes a

job as a dancer but quits when her audience prefers to watch football on the bar's TV set. Segal attends a tacky movie, "Cycle Sluts," in which Streisand makes an appearance, and, missing her, he seeks her out. Later, Segal squires Streisand to the home of his stuffy intended, Anson. There, after

smoking some grass, Segal and Streisand hop in the tub together. When Anson and her parents, Manning and Carney, come home, Streisand immediately recognizes Manning as one of her kinkiest Johns. As the film winds to its close, Streisand and Segal walk through Central Park, unquestionably in love.

The film did well at the box office, and proved that Streisand didn't have to sing to make her presence felt. Cinematographer Stradling died while the film was in production and was replaced by Laszlo. Although there are some very funny scenes here, there is too much emphasis on smut for the film

to be called witty.

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  • Rating: R
  • Review: For her first non-singing role, Streisand chose this bawdy adaptation of Manhoff's hit 1964 play, which starred Alan Alda and Diana Sands. The female lead, written to be played a black woman, was altered to fit Streisand's ethnicity, but many of the play's… (more)

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