The Other Love

  • 1947
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Drama

Enterprise, headed by David Lewis, didn't make too many movies before giving up the ghost, and this picture serves as a good example of why. Lewis had been Thalberg's assistant and worked on many MGM films, including CAMILLE, the theme of which he returns to with THE OTHER LOVE. The working title for this soap was "No Other Love" and it was released in...read more

Where to Watch

Available to Stream

  • Watch on
Rating:

Enterprise, headed by David Lewis, didn't make too many movies before giving up the ghost, and this picture serves as a good example of why. Lewis had been Thalberg's assistant and worked on many MGM films, including CAMILLE, the theme of which he returns to with THE OTHER LOVE. The

working title for this soap was "No Other Love" and it was released in the 1950s as MAN-KILLER, a title that had nothing to do with the content. Erich Maria Remarque wrote the short story on which it was based and they expanded it to feature length with some padded sequences. Stanwyck is a

successful concert pianist with tuberculosis. She goes to a swanky sanitarium in the Swiss Alps, where she is immediately entranced by her doctor, the dashing Niven, a man whose bedside manner is legendary. Stanwyck is not long for this world and Niven knows that, so he attempts to keep her calm

and rested, thus limiting her devil-may-care style. He forces her to rest and she indicates her disagreement with that prescription. She becomes friendly with another patient, Lorring, whose death causes Stanwyck to reconsider her own mortality and rebel against Niven's wishes. She takes off with

race driver Conte (who almost steals the movie with his carefree characterization of an early Mario Andretti) and has a mad fling in Europe while her body can still stand the rigors of high living. Eventually, she returns to the hospital and she and Niven are marrried. He lies and tells her that

she will soon be well enough to return to her usual life. One night, while he's playing Chopin on the piano, she just closes her eyes and dies--and none too soon, as Niven's piano playing is atrocious. Lots of glitz, good production values, but the more than a passing nod to CAMILLE makes this a

bit too familiar to be taken seriously. Stanwyck's appearance, as she becomes sicker, never changes and she looks, in death, the same way she looked in life, a great deal like the healthy Barbara Stanwyck. Gilbert Roland plays a gambling house croupier as a parody of a gambling house croupier. One

added note about the credits: both Keller and Milner are variously listed as cinematographer, both Glickman and Polk have been listed as musical director, and Moreland as well as the Lydeckers have been given credit, from various sources, for the special effects. We could't tell you which were

correct, so we've given them all.

Cast & Details See all »

  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Enterprise, headed by David Lewis, didn't make too many movies before giving up the ghost, and this picture serves as a good example of why. Lewis had been Thalberg's assistant and worked on many MGM films, including CAMILLE, the theme of which he returns… (more)

Show More »