The Night Of The Following Day

  • 1969
  • Movie
  • R
  • Crime

Brando would be well advised never to make another film for Universal Studios, as those made under the Universal banner have all been among his least impressive efforts. On the San Fernando Valley lot, he made THE UGLY AMERICAN; THE COUNTESS FROM HONG KONG; THE APPALOOSA; BEDTIME STORY; and now this fraud from start to finish, another of executive coproducer...read more

Where to Watch

Available to Stream

  • Watch on
Rating:

Brando would be well advised never to make another film for Universal Studios, as those made under the Universal banner have all been among his least impressive efforts. On the San Fernando Valley lot, he made THE UGLY AMERICAN; THE COUNTESS FROM HONG KONG; THE APPALOOSA; BEDTIME STORY; and

now this fraud from start to finish, another of executive coproducer Elliott Kastner's "deals" that can never quite be called a motion picture. Wealthy Franklin arrives in Paris, where she is kidnaped by Brando and Boone. (Brando's name in the picture is "Bud"--oddly enough, a real-life nickname

since childhood.) The kidnapers take their victim to a country road, switch her limousine for a car driven by her stewardess, Moreno (in a silly blonde wig), and drive to an isolated house on a French beach. Here they place a call to Franklin's father, Wanner, using an ingenious technique devised

by Boone that prevents tracing. Moreno's brother, Hahn, is also part of the plot. When Brando realizes that Moreno is a heroin addict, and that Boone has his own plans for Franklin, he has second thoughts about the scheme. Buhr, a fisherman who turns out to be a cop, stops by the house and is told

by Moreno that she's taken this tranquil place as a resting spot for her husband. Franklin tries to get away but is caught; when Brando tries to help her, Moreno's jealous resentment shows. Boone goes to Paris to talk about the ransom to Wanner, who flies to the small local airport for telephone

instructions from Moreno to meet her and Hahn at the local bistro. At the cafe, Marin (the bartender-owner) smells a rat, goes for his gun, and wounds Hahn. Then Buhr arrives, and after more gunplay is shot. Moreno and Hahn take the money and go back to the cottage where Boone, who has evidently

just raped Franklin, is putting on his gloves and thanking her. He machine-guns Brando, Moreno, and Hahn. Brando manages to escape the hail of bullets, however, follows Boone along the beach, and eventually kills him. He then returns to find Franklin stripped and bleeding in the cottage and cuts

her loose. Then (are you ready for this?) she wakes up in the airplane that is arriving at Orly. It's all been a dream (what a creative twist!) that may, or may not, have been inspired by a radio play she's been listening to on a tiny transistor radio. The film has good photography, interesting

locations, and an unusual characterization. Brando looks wonderful in the movie--lithe, blond, and strong-- probably just before he said "The hell with it" and began eating his way into battleship class. The author of the novel this film is based on also wrote the book that inspired Kubrick's

little classic THE KILLING. Would that Kubrick had done this one as well.

Cast & Details See all »

  • Rating: R
  • Review: Brando would be well advised never to make another film for Universal Studios, as those made under the Universal banner have all been among his least impressive efforts. On the San Fernando Valley lot, he made THE UGLY AMERICAN; THE COUNTESS FROM HONG KONG… (more)

Show More »

Trending TonightSee all »